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Energy price reform in China

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  • Zhongxiang Zhang

Abstract

China has determined to assign the market a decisive role in allocating resources. To that end, getting energy prices right is crucial because this sends clear signals to both producers and consumers of energy. While the overall trend of China’s energy pricing reform since 1984 has been moving away from the prices set by the central government in the centrally planned economy and towards a more market-oriented pricing mechanism, the pace and scale of the reform differ across energy types. This article discusses the evolution of price reforms for coal, petroleum products, natural gas, electricity and renewable power in China, and provides some analysis of these energy price reforms, in order to allow the market to play a decisive role in resource allocation and help China’s transition to a low-carbon economy.

Suggested Citation

  • Zhongxiang Zhang, 2018. "Energy price reform in China," CCEP Working Papers 1805, Centre for Climate & Energy Policy, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  • Handle: RePEc:een:ccepwp:1805
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    File URL: https://ccep.crawford.anu.edu.au/sites/default/files/publication/ccep_crawford_anu_edu_au/2019-03/zhang_zx_2018_energy_price_reform_in_china_ccep_working_paper_1805.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Yana Jin & Shiqiu Zhang, 2013. "Elasticity Estimates of Urban Resident Demand for Electricity: A Case Study in Beijing," Energy & Environment, , vol. 24(7-8), pages 1229-1248, December.
    2. Zhang, ZhongXiang, 2010. "China in the transition to a low-carbon economy," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(11), pages 6638-6653, November.
    3. Jinglian, Wu & Renwei, Zhao, 1987. "The dual pricing system in China's industry," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(3), pages 309-318, September.
    4. Ngan, H.W., 2010. "Electricity regulation and electricity market reforms in China," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(5), pages 2142-2148, May.
    5. Xia, Fang & Song, Feng, 2017. "The uneven development of wind power in China: Determinants and the role of supporting policies," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 278-286.
    6. Zeng, Ming & Yang, Yongqi & Wang, Lihua & Sun, Jinghui, 2016. "The power industry reform in China 2015: Policies, evaluations and solutions," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 94-110.
    7. Fisher-Vanden, Karen, 2009. "Energy in China: Understanding Past Trends and Future Directions," International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics, now publishers, vol. 3(3), pages 217-244, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ashima Goyal, 2019. "What Explains the Volatility of India's Catch-up Growth?," Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai Working Papers 2019-008, Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai, India.
    2. Ashima Goyal, 2019. "What Explains the Volatility of India’s Catch-up Growth?," Working Papers id:13026, eSocialSciences.
    3. Wang, Tiantian & Zhang, Dayong & Ji, Qiang & Shi, Xunpeng, 2020. "Market reforms and determinants of import natural gas prices in China," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 196(C).

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • H23 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Externalities; Redistributive Effects; Environmental Taxes and Subsidies
    • H71 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - State and Local Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products
    • O53 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Asia including Middle East
    • P22 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - Prices
    • Q41 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Demand and Supply; Prices
    • Q43 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Energy and the Macroeconomy
    • Q48 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Government Policy
    • Q53 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Air Pollution; Water Pollution; Noise; Hazardous Waste; Solid Waste; Recycling
    • Q58 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Government Policy

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