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Monetary Policy in an International Financial Crisis

Author

Listed:
  • Lawrence J. Christiano

    (International Monetary Fund)

  • Christopher Gust

    (International Monetary Fund)

  • Jorge Roldos

    (International Monetary Fund)

Abstract

We explore the role of monetary policy in the aftermath of a financial crisis. We develop a small open economy model with limited participation of households in a financial intermediary that provides liquidity to satisfy firms' working capital needs. Firms require two forms of working capital: domestic funds to pay for the wage bill and foreign funds to finance imports of intermediate goods. A shortage of either one of the sources of working capital acts as a drag on economic activity. In normal times, an interest rate cut is expansionary. In a financial crisis, collateral constraints bind and an expansion of domestic liquidity leads to a real exchange rate depreciation that further tightens the collateral constraint and offsets the traditional (expansionary) liquidity channel. In addition, the tightening of the collateral constraint places a premium on paying off foreign debt, reinforcing the contractionary effects of an interest rate cut. We study the conditions under which such monetary policy action is contractionary and relate them to recent emerging market crises.

Suggested Citation

  • Lawrence J. Christiano & Christopher Gust & Jorge Roldos, 2000. "Monetary Policy in an International Financial Crisis," Econometric Society World Congress 2000 Contributed Papers 1814, Econometric Society.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecm:wc2000:1814
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    Cited by:

    1. Enrique G. Mendoza & Katherine A. Smith, 2002. "Margin Calls, Trading Costs, and Asset Prices in Emerging Markets: The Finanical Mechanics of the 'Sudden Stop' Phenomenon," NBER Working Papers 9286, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Cristina Arellano & Enrique Mendoza, 2002. "Fricciones crediticias y 'paradas repentinas' en pequeñas economías abiertas: un marco de equilibrio del ciclo económico para crisis en mercados emergentes," Research Department Publications 4308, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    3. Olivier Jeanne & Charles Wyplosz, 2003. "The International Lender of Last Resort. How Large Is Large Enough?," NBER Chapters, in: Managing Currency Crises in Emerging Markets, pages 89-124, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Enrique Mendoza, 2002. "¿Por qué deben las economías emergentes renunciar a su moneda nacional? El argumento a favor," Research Department Publications 4310, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    5. Olivier Jeanne & Charles Wyplosz, 2003. "The International Lender of Last Resort. How Large Is Large Enough?," NBER Chapters, in: Managing Currency Crises in Emerging Markets, pages 89-124, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Cristina Arellano & Enrique G. Mendoza, 2002. "Credit Frictions and 'Sudden Stops' in Small Open Economies: An Equilibrium Business Cycle Framework for Emerging Markets Crises," NBER Working Papers 8880, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Ahmed, Shaghil, 2003. "Sources of economic fluctuations in Latin America and implications for choice of exchange rate regimes," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(1), pages 181-202, October.
    8. Robert Dekle & Kenneth M. Kletzer, 2002. "Financial intermediation, agency and collateral and the dynamics of banking crises: theory and evidence for the Japanese banking crisis," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue Sep.
    9. Enrique G. Mendoza, 2002. "Why Should Emerging Economies Give up National Currencies: A Case for 'Institutions Substitution'," NBER Working Papers 8950, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Robert Dekle & Kenneth Kletzer, 2002. "Domestic Bank Regulation and Financial Crises: Theory and Empirical Evidence from East Asia," NBER Chapters, in: Preventing Currency Crises in Emerging Markets, pages 507-558, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Robert Dekle & Kenneth Kletzer, 2002. "Domestic Bank Regulation and Financial Crises: Theory and Empirical Evidence from East Asia," NBER Chapters, in: Preventing Currency Crises in Emerging Markets, pages 507-558, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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