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The Effects Of High School Choices On Academic Performance And Early Labour Market Outcomes

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  • Lorenzo Cappellari

Abstract

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  • Lorenzo Cappellari, 2004. "The Effects Of High School Choices On Academic Performance And Early Labour Market Outcomes," Royal Economic Society Annual Conference 2004 92, Royal Economic Society.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecj:ac2004:92
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    Cited by:

    1. Floro Ernesto Caroleo & Francesco Pastore, 2012. "Talking about the Pigou paradox: Socio-educational background and educational outcomes of AlmaLaurea," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 33(1), pages 27-50, March.
    2. Paola Giuliano, 2008. "Culture and the Family: An Application to Educational Choices in Italy," Rivista di Politica Economica, SIPI Spa, vol. 98(4), pages 3-38, July-Augu.
    3. Floro Ernesto Caroleo & Francesco Pastore, 2012. "Overeducation at a glance. Determinants and wage effects of the educational mismatch, looking at the AlmaLaurea data," Discussion Papers 18_2012, CRISEI, University of Naples "Parthenope", Italy.
    4. Małgorzata Kłobuszewska & Magdalena Rokicka, 2016. "Do local characteristics matter? Secondary school track choice in Poland," Ekonomia journal, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw, vol. 45.
    5. Steve Bradley & Giuseppe Migali, 2012. "The direct and indirect effects of education policy on school and post school outcomes," Working Papers 24958831, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
    6. Aina, Carmen & Pastore, Francesco, 2012. "Delayed Graduation and Overeducation: A Test of the Human Capital Model versus the Screening Hypothesis," IZA Discussion Papers 6413, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. P. Lovaglio & S. Verzillo, 2016. "Heterogeneous economic returns to higher education: evidence from Italy," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 50(2), pages 791-822, March.
    8. Steve Bradley & Giuseppe Migali, 2014. "The Effects of the Specialist Schools Education Policy on School and Post-School Outcomes in England," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 28(4), pages 449-465, December.

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