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The Cost of Climate Change to the German Fruit Vegetation Sector


  • Claudia Kemfert
  • Hans Kremers


This paper applies the concept of damage coefficients introduced in Houba and Kremers (2008) to provide an estimate of the cost of climate change - in particular the cost of changes in mean regional temperature and precipitation - to the fruit vegetation sector. We concentrate on the production of apples in the German 'Alte Land' region. The estimated cost of climate change on apple-growing in the 'Alte Land' is dependent on the assumptions regarding developments in the rentability of land not related to climate change in the fruit sector.

Suggested Citation

  • Claudia Kemfert & Hans Kremers, 2009. "The Cost of Climate Change to the German Fruit Vegetation Sector," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 857, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:diw:diwwpp:dp857

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Enrico Santarelli & Marco Vivarelli, 2007. "Entrepreneurship and the process of firms’ entry, survival and growth," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 16(3), pages 455-488, June.
    2. Eichhorst, Werner & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2007. "Dann waren's nur noch vier… Wie viele (und welche) Maßnahmen der aktiven Arbeitsmarktpolitik brauchen wir noch? Eine Bilanz nach der Evaluation der Hartz-Reformen," IZA Discussion Papers 2605, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Werner Eichhorst & Klaus F. Zimmermann, 2007. "And Then There Were Four...How Many (and Which) Measures of Active Labor Market Policy Do We Still Need?," Applied Economics Quarterly (formerly: Konjunkturpolitik), Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, vol. 53(3), pages 243-272.
    4. Marco Caliendo & Viktor Steiner, 2007. "Ich-AG und Überbrückungsgeld: neue Ergebnisse bestätigen Erfolg," DIW Wochenbericht, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, vol. 74(3), pages 25-32.
    5. Hans J. Baumgartner & Marco Caliendo & Viktor Steiner, 2006. "Existenzgründungsförderung für Arbeitslose: erste Evaluationsergebnisse für Deutschland," Vierteljahrshefte zur Wirtschaftsforschung / Quarterly Journal of Economic Research, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, vol. 75(3), pages 32-48.
    6. Pfeiffer, Friedhelm & Reize, Frank, 2000. "Business start-ups by the unemployed -- an econometric analysis based on firm data," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 7(5), pages 629-663, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Döll, Sebastian & Schulze, Sven, 2010. "Klimawandel und Perspektiven der Landwirtschaft in der Metropolregion Hamburg," HWWI Research Papers 1-34, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWI).
    2. Harold Houba & Hans Kremers, 2009. "Environmental Damage and Price Taking Behaviour by Firms and Consumers," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 09-029/1, Tinbergen Institute.

    More about this item


    fruit vegetation; Alte Land; climate change; land productivity; land rentability; cost of climate change;

    JEL classification:

    • D1 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior
    • D21 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Firm Behavior: Theory
    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity
    • D61 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Allocative Efficiency; Cost-Benefit Analysis
    • D62 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Externalities
    • Q12 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Micro Analysis of Farm Firms, Farm Households, and Farm Input Markets
    • Q24 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Land
    • Q51 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Valuation of Environmental Effects
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming
    • R32 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Real Estate Markets, Spatial Production Analysis, and Firm Location - - - Other Spatial Production and Pricing Analysis

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