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Admissible mixing distributions for a general class of mixture survival models with known asymptotics


  • Trifon I. Missov

    (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany)

  • Maxim S. Finkelstein

    (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany)


Statistical analysis of data on the longest living humans leaves room for speculation whether the human force of mortality is actually leveling o®. Based on this uncertainty, we study a mixture failure model, introduced by Finkelstein and Esaulova (2006) that generalizes, among others, the proportional hazards and accelerated failure time models. In this paper we, first, extend the Abelian theorem of these authors to mixing distributions, whose densities are functions of regular variation. In addition, taking into account the asymptotic behavior of the mixture hazard rate prescribed by this Abelian theorem, we prove three Tauberian-type theorems that describe the class of admissible mixing distributions. We illustrate our findings with examples of popular mixing distributions that are used to model unobserved heterogeneity.

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  • Trifon I. Missov & Maxim S. Finkelstein, 2011. "Admissible mixing distributions for a general class of mixture survival models with known asymptotics," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2011-004, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:wpaper:wp-2011-004

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Tine De Moor & Jan Luiten Van Zanden, 2010. "Girl power: the European marriage pattern and labour markets in the North Sea region in the late medieval and early modern period -super-1," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 63(1), pages 1-33, February.
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    1. repec:eee:thpobi:v:109:y:2016:i:c:p:54-62 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:eee:thpobi:v:90:y:2013:i:c:p:29-35 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Elizabeth Wrigley-Field, 2014. "Mortality Deceleration and Mortality Selection: Three Unexpected Implications of a Simple Model," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 51(1), pages 51-71, February.
    4. Adriaan Kalwij, 2014. "An empirical analysis of the importance of controlling for unobserved heterogeneity when estimating the income-mortality gradient," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 31(30), pages 913-940, October.
    5. Virginia Zarulli, 2016. "Unobserved Heterogeneity of Frailty in the Analysis of Socioeconomic Differences in Health and Mortality," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 32(1), pages 55-72, February.
    6. repec:eee:stapro:v:126:y:2017:i:c:p:76-82 is not listed on IDEAS

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    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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