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On the Internationalization of Portfolios

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Abstract

Portfolio theory has been an important component of open economy macroeconomic models. In those models, it is essential to distinguish among several categories of assets, both foreign and domestic, and to specify the demands and supplies. This framework has become increasingly relevant. Movements of capital across regional and national boundaries, and across currencies, have exploded in volume, thanks to the dismantling of currency and exchange controls and other financial regulations and to revolutionary economies in technologies of communication and transactions. The globalization of financial markets was stimulated by the floating exchange rate regime established in 1973.

Suggested Citation

  • William C. Brainard & James Tobin, 1991. "On the Internationalization of Portfolios," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 991, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
  • Handle: RePEc:cwl:cwldpp:991
    Note: CFP 840.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jonathan Heathcote & Fabrizio Perri, 2013. "The International Diversification Puzzle Is Not as Bad as You Think," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 121(6), pages 1108-1159.
    2. Shiller, Robert J., 1999. "Social security and institutions for intergenerational, intragenerational, and international risk-sharing," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 50(1), pages 165-204, June.
    3. Maurice Obstfeld, 1993. "International Capital Mobility in the 1990s," NBER Working Papers 4534, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Julliard, Christian, 2002. "The international diversification puzzle is not worse than you think," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 4814, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    5. Glassman, Debra A. & Riddick, Leigh A., 2001. "What causes home asset bias and how should it be measured?," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 8(1), pages 35-54, March.
    6. Jeffrey A. Frankel, 1994. "Introduction to "The Internationalization of Equity Markets "," NBER Chapters,in: The Internationalization of Equity Markets, pages 1-20 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Nicolas Coeurdacier & Robert Kollmann & Philippe Martin, 2009. "International Portfolios with Supply, Demand and Redistributive Shocks," NBER Chapters,in: NBER International Seminar on Macroeconomics 2007, pages 231-263 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Liljeblom, Eva & Loflund, Anders, 2005. "Determinants of international portfolio investment flows to a small market: Empirical evidence," Journal of Multinational Financial Management, Elsevier, vol. 15(3), pages 211-233, July.
    9. Martin Feldstein, 1994. "Tax policy and international capital flows," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 130(4), pages 675-697, December.
    10. Jeffrey A. Frankel, 1994. "The Internationalization of Equity Markets," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number fran94-1, January.
    11. Frankel, Jeffrey A., 1994. "The Internalization of Equity Markets: Introduction," Center for International and Development Economics Research (CIDER) Working Papers 233216, University of California-Berkeley, Department of Economics.
    12. Bretscher, Lorenzo & Julliard, Christian & Rosa, Carlo, 2016. "Human capital and international portfolio diversification: A reappraisal," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 99(S1), pages 78-96.
    13. Bottazzi, Laura & Pesenti, Paolo & van Wincoop, Eric, 1996. "Wages, profits and the international portfolio puzzle," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 40(2), pages 219-254, February.
    14. Tesar, Linda L., 1995. "Evaluating the gains from international risksharing," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 42(1), pages 95-143, June.
    15. Michael A. Clemens & Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2000. "Where did British Foreign Capital Go? Fundamentals, Failures and the Lucas Paradox: 1870-1913," NBER Working Papers 8028, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    16. Stewen, Iryna, 2014. "Is Real Exchange Rate Hedging Motive Still Important in Determining Equity Home Bias?," Annual Conference 2014 (Hamburg): Evidence-based Economic Policy 100571, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Portfolio choice; open economy; capital mobility; exchange rate;

    JEL classification:

    • G11 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Portfolio Choice; Investment Decisions
    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics
    • F21 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Investment; Long-Term Capital Movements
    • F31 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Exchange

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