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Inflation Inequality In South Africa

  • Morne Oosthuizen

    ()

    (Development Policy Research Unit
    Researcher)

The inflation crisis of 2008 drew greater attention to the varying experiences of inflation in South Africa and, in particular, to the fact that different groups within society may have significantly differing inflation experiences. The groups may be defined according to income level, but may also be categorised according to demographic, labour market and other characteristics.

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File URL: http://www.dpru.uct.ac.za/sites/default/files/image_tool/images/36/DPRU%20WP13-158.pdf
File Function: First version, 2013
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Paper provided by University of Cape Town, Development Policy Research Unit in its series Working Papers with number 13158.

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Length: 47 pages
Date of creation: Oct 2013
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published in Working Paper Series by the Development Policy Research Unit, October 2013, pages 1-47
Handle: RePEc:ctw:wpaper:13158
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  1. Bart Hobijn & David Lagakos, 2005. "Inflation Inequality In The United States," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 51(4), pages 581-606, December.
  2. Morné Oosthuizen, 2007. "Consumer Price Inflation across the Income Distribution in South Africa," Working Papers 07129, University of Cape Town, Development Policy Research Unit.
  3. Murray Leibbrandt & Arden Finn & Ingrid Woolard, 2012. "Describing and decomposing post-apartheid income inequality in South Africa," Development Southern Africa, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(1), pages 19-34, March.
  4. Murray Leibbrandt & Ingrid Woolard & Arden Finn & Jonathan Argent, 2010. "Trends in South African Income Distribution and Poverty since the Fall of Apartheid," OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers 101, OECD Publishing.
  5. Michael, Robert T, 1979. "Variation across Households in the Rate of Inflation," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 11(1), pages 32-46, February.
  6. Eduardo Ley, 2005. "Whose inflation? A characterization of the CPI plutocratic gap," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 57(4), pages 634-646, October.
  7. Mario Izquierdo & Eduardo Ley & Javier Ruiz-Castillo, 2003. "The Plutocratic Gap in the CPI: Evidence from Spain," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 50(1), pages 7.
  8. Angus Deaton, 1998. "Getting Prices Right: What Should Be Done?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 12(1), pages 37-46, Winter.
  9. Alessandra Cepparulo & Francesca Gastaldi & Paolo Liberati, 2010. "The distributional and welfare impact of inflation in Italy," Working Papers 134, University of Rome La Sapienza, Department of Public Economics.
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