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La Economia de Occidente y la del Resto del Mundo: una Perspectiva Milenaria

  • Angus Maddison

    ()

En este ensayo se mantiene que Europa Occidental inició su despegue económico con respecto al resto del mundo durante la alta edad moderna o incluso la baja edad media. Empleando la última información cuantitativa disponible, se argumenta que, entre los años 1000 y 1820, el PIB per cápita de Europa Occidental se multiplicó por tres, frente a un crecimiento medio de sólo el 33 por cien en el resto del mundo. Entre los factores responsables de esta diferencia destacan el progreso en las técnicas de navegación, con sus consecuencias sobre el comercio y la división del trabajo; la adopción de instituciones también favorables al comercio; la revolución del conocimiento iniciada durante el Renacimiento; la propia división política de Europa, con sus corolarios de competencia entre estados y mayor libertad individual, y el desarrollo del individualismo, favorecido por la tradición cultural cristiana.

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Paper provided by Universidad Carlos III, Instituto Figuerola de Historia y Ciencias Sociales in its series Working Papers in Economic History with number dilf0501.

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Date of creation: Jan 2005
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Handle: RePEc:cte:whrepe:dilf0501
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  1. Thomas, Robert Paul, 1965. "A Quantitative Approach to the Study of the Effects of British Imperial Policy upon Colonial Welfare: Some Preliminary Findings," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 25(04), pages 615-638, December.
  2. O'Rourke, Kevin H. & Williamson, Jeffrey G., 2002. "After Columbus: Explaining Europe'S Overseas Trade Boom, 1500 1800," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 62(02), pages 417-456, June.
  3. Maddison, Angus & Ark, Bart van, 1994. "The international comparison of real product and productivity," GGDC Research Memorandum 199406, Groningen Growth and Development Centre, University of Groningen.
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