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Regulated Efficiency, World Trade Organization Accession and the Motor Vehicle Sector in China


  • Francois, Joseph
  • Spinanger, Dean


This Paper is concerned with the interaction of regulated efficiency and World Trade Organization (WTO) accession and its impact on China’s motor vehicle sector. The analysis is conducted using a 23-sector/25-region computable general equilibrium model. Regulatory reform and internal restructuring are found to be critical. Restructuring is represented by a cost reduction following from consolidation and rationalization that moves costs toward global norms. Without restructuring, WTO accession means a surge of final imports, though imports of parts could well fall as production moves offshore. With restructuring, however, the final assembly industry can be made competitive by world standards, with a strengthened position for the industry.

Suggested Citation

  • Francois, Joseph & Spinanger, Dean, 2004. "Regulated Efficiency, World Trade Organization Accession and the Motor Vehicle Sector in China," CEPR Discussion Papers 4439, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:4439

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Aaditya Mattoo & Devesh Roy & Arvind Subramanian, 2003. "The Africa Growth and Opportunity Act and its Rules of Origin: Generosity Undermined?," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 26(6), pages 829-851, June.
    2. Paul Brenton & Miriam Manchin, 2003. "Making EU Trade Agreements Work: The Role of Rules of Origin," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 26(5), pages 755-769, May.
    3. Patricia Augier & Michael Gasiorek & Charles Lai Tong, 2005. "The impact of rules of origin on trade flows," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 20(43), pages 567-624, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Elena Ianchovichina & Terrie Walmsley, 2005. "Impact of China's WTO Accession on East Asia," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 23(2), pages 261-277, April.
    2. Kym Anderson & Jikun Huang & Elena Ianchovichina, 2002. "Impact of ChinaÂ’s WTO Accession on Farm-Nonfarm Income Inequality and Rural Poverty," Centre for International Economic Studies Working Papers 2002-11, University of Adelaide, Centre for International Economic Studies.
    3. Deqiang Liu & Yanyun Zhao, 2006. "Ownership, Foreign Investment and Productivity--A Case Study of the Automotive Industry in China," Microeconomics Working Papers 21892, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.

    More about this item


    automobile sector; China accession to wto;

    JEL classification:

    • F13 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Policy; International Trade Organizations
    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade
    • F17 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Forecasting and Simulation


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