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Abolishing Exchange Control: The UK Experience

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  • Artis, Michael J
  • Taylor, Mark P

Abstract

The paper addresses some of the effects of the removal of exchange controls in the UK in 1979. Nonparametric tests indicate that one consequence of the removal was a marked reduction in the volatility of the on-shore/off-shore differential. Co-integration tests suggest that abolition contributed positively to the long run integration of the UK stock market with similar markets in other international centers, though there is no evidence that the correlation of short run stock market returns across international centers was more strongly positive after 1979. The evidence of strong integration effect at the `short' end of the capital market is consistent with qualitative monetary regulations which have a `tax-like' effect.

Suggested Citation

  • Artis, Michael J & Taylor, Mark P, 1989. "Abolishing Exchange Control: The UK Experience," CEPR Discussion Papers 294, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:294
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Daniele Checchi, 1992. "Capital controls and distribution of income: Empirical evidence for Great Britain Japan and Australia," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 128(3), pages 558-587, September.
    2. Richard C. Marston, 1992. "Interest Differentials Under Fixed and Flexible Exchange Rates: The Effects of Capital Controls and Exchange Risk," NBER Working Papers 4053, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. David Begg & Stephany Griffith-Jones, 1998. "Swinging since the 60's: Fluctuations in UK Saving and Lessons for Latin America," Research Department Publications 3032, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    4. Lucio Sarno & Mark Taylor, 1998. "Exchange controls, international capital flows and saving-investment correlations in the UK: An empirical investigation," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 134(1), pages 69-98, March.
    5. Mr. R. B. Johnston & Chris Ryan, 1994. "The Impact of Controlson Capital Movementson the Private Capital Accounts of Countries' Balance of Payments: Empirical Estimates and Policy Implications," IMF Working Papers 1994/078, International Monetary Fund.
    6. Battilossi, Stefano, 2009. "The Eurodollar revolution in financial technology. Deregulation, innovation and structural change in Western banking in the 1960s-70s," IFCS - Working Papers in Economic History.WH wp09-10, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Instituto Figuerola.
    7. Schmukler, Sergio L. & Serven, Luis, 2002. "Pricing currency risk : facts and puzzles from currency boards," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2815, The World Bank.

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