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On the mobility policies of companies: what are the good practices? The Belgian case

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  • VAN MALDEREN, Laurent
  • JOURQUIN, Bart
  • THOMAS, Isabelle
  • VANOUTRIVE, Thomas

Abstract

Companies play an important role in the mobility debate as they can be considered as the primary ‘creators’ of commuting traffic. In recent years, companies have developed a variety of initiatives to improve the mobility of their employees, although their visions and actions are often neglected in the research literature. This paper aims at identifying the good practice in mobility policies of workplaces located in Belgium. To achieve this objective, existing research and two large-scale Belgian surveys of commuting are analysed. First, workplaces are clustered in order to identify those where the alternative modes of transport which are promoted by the policy are popular among employees. Then, quantitative analyses are performed to find out what are the good practices of mobility policies.
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Suggested Citation

  • VAN MALDEREN, Laurent & JOURQUIN, Bart & THOMAS, Isabelle & VANOUTRIVE, Thomas, 2012. "On the mobility policies of companies: what are the good practices? The Belgian case," CORE Discussion Papers RP 2419, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
  • Handle: RePEc:cor:louvrp:2419
    Note: In : Transport Policy, 21, 10-19, 2012
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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tranpol.2011.12.005
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    Cited by:

    1. Van Malderen, Laurent & Jourquin, Bart & Pecheux, Claude & Thomas, Isabelle & Van De Vijver, Elien & Vanoutrive, Thomas & Verhetsel, Ann & Witlox, Frank, 2013. "Exploring the profession of mobility manager in Belgium and their impact on commuting," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 46-55.
    2. repec:kap:transp:v:44:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s11116-015-9672-4 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Habibian, Meeghat & Kermanshah, Mohammad, 2013. "Coping with congestion: Understanding the role of simultaneous transportation demand management policies on commuters," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 229-237.
    4. Laurent Van Malderen & Bart Jourquin & Isabelle Thomas, 2012. "Employers Transport Plans: Do They Change The Commuting Behaviour Of Workers?," ERSA conference papers ersa12p1048, European Regional Science Association.
    5. Matthew Clark & Kate Gifford & Jillian Anable & Scott Le Vine, 2015. "Business-to-business carsharing: evidence from Britain of factors associated with employer-based carsharing membership and its impacts," Transportation, Springer, vol. 42(3), pages 471-495, May.
    6. Cass, Noel & Faulconbridge, James, 2016. "Commuting practices: New insights into modal shift from theories of social practice," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 1-14.
    7. Macmillen, James & Stead, Dominic, 2014. "Learning heuristic or political rhetoric? Sustainable mobility and the functions of ‘best practice’," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 79-87.

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