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Social protection performance in the European Union: comparison and convergence

Author

Listed:
  • COELLI, Tim

    (CEPA, University of Queensland)

  • LEFEBVRE, Mathieu

    (CREPP, Université de Liège)

  • PESTIEAU, Pierre

    (Université catholique de Louvain (UCL). Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE))

Abstract

In this paper we use data on five social inclusion indicators (poverty, inequality, unemployment, education and health) to assess the performance of 15 European welfare states (EU15) over a ten-year period from 1995 to 2004. Aggregate measures of performance are obtained using index number methods similar to those employed in the construction of the widely used Human Development Index (HDI). These are compared with alternative measures derived from data envelopment analysis (DEA) methods. The influence of methodology choice and the assumptions made in scaling indicators upon the results obtained is illustrated and discussed. We also analyse the evolution of performance over time, finding evidence of some convergence in performance and no sign of social dumping.

Suggested Citation

  • COELLI, Tim & LEFEBVRE, Mathieu & PESTIEAU, Pierre, 2008. "Social protection performance in the European Union: comparison and convergence," CORE Discussion Papers 2008012, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
  • Handle: RePEc:cor:louvco:2008012
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    File URL: http://www.uclouvain.be/cps/ucl/doc/core/documents/coreDP2008_12.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jakob von Weizsäcker, 2003. "The Hayek Pension: An efficient minimum pension to complement the welfare state," CESifo Working Paper Series 1064, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. Ted O'Donoghue & Matthew Rabin, 2001. "Choice and Procrastination," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 116(1), pages 121-160.
    3. Feldstein, Martin & Liebman, Jeffrey B., 2002. "Social security," Handbook of Public Economics,in: A. J. Auerbach & M. Feldstein (ed.), Handbook of Public Economics, edition 1, volume 4, chapter 32, pages 2245-2324 Elsevier.
    4. Diamond, Peter & Koszegi, Botond, 2003. "Quasi-hyperbolic discounting and retirement," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(9-10), pages 1839-1872, September.
    5. Martin Feldstein, 1985. "The Optimal Level of Social Security Benefits," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 100(2), pages 303-320.
    6. George-Marios Angeletos, 2001. "The Hyberbolic Consumption Model: Calibration, Simulation, and Empirical Evaluation," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 15(3), pages 47-68, Summer.
    7. Homburg, Stefan, 2000. "Compulsory savings in the welfare state," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 77(2), pages 233-239, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ania, Ana B. & Wagener, Andreas, 2009. "The Open Method of Coordination (OMC) as an Evolutionary Learning Process," Discussion Papers in Economics 10332, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
    2. Etibar Jafarov & Victoria Gunnarsson, 2008. "Efficiency of Government Social Spending in Croatia," Financial Theory and Practice, Institute of Public Finance, vol. 32(3), pages 289-320.
    3. Victoria Gunnarsson & Etibar Jafarov, 2008. "Government Spending on Health Care and Education in Croatia; Efficiency and Reform Options," IMF Working Papers 08/136, International Monetary Fund.
    4. Simona-Gabriela Masca, 2014. "Efficiency of Public Expenditure: Review and Preliminary Results for Romania," International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Sciences, Human Resource Management Academic Research Society, International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Sciences, vol. 4(8), pages 326-345, August.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    performance measure; best practice frontier; social protection.;

    JEL classification:

    • H50 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - General
    • C14 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Semiparametric and Nonparametric Methods: General
    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity

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