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A Harris-style miniature version of ORANI


  • Peter Cory
  • Mark Horridge


A small version of ORANI is constructed, incorporating economies of scale and imperfect competition. Economic mechanisms are borrowed from a model constructed by Richard Harris, and described in his 1984 book "Trade, Industrial Policy and Canadian Manufacturing". The miniature Harris-like model is used to determine whether Harris' conclusions might carry over to Australia, and to see which of his several assumptions are responsible for his more striking results. We find that import-parity pricing is responsible for most of the 'action', while Lerner pricing (based on perceived demand elasticities) yields results similar to the conventional CRTS model. Please note: The PDF download of this fairly old paper is an optical scan of indifferent, but legible, quality

Suggested Citation

  • Peter Cory & Mark Horridge, 1985. "A Harris-style miniature version of ORANI," Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre Working Papers op-54, Victoria University, Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre.
  • Handle: RePEc:cop:wpaper:op-54

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Adams, Philip D. & Dixon, Peter B. & McDonald, Daina & Meagher, G. A. & Parmenter, Brian R., 1994. "Forecasts for the Australian economy using the MONASH model," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 10(4), pages 557-571, December.
    2. Powell, Alan A. & Snape, Richard H., 1993. "The contribution of applied general equilibrium analysis to policy reform in Australia," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 15(4), pages 393-414, August.
    3. Robinson, Sherman, 1991. "Macroeconomics, financial variables, and computable general equilibrium models," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 19(11), pages 1509-1525, November.
    4. Robinson, Sherman, 1989. "Multisectoral models," Handbook of Development Economics,in: Hollis Chenery & T.N. Srinivasan (ed.), Handbook of Development Economics, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 18, pages 885-947 Elsevier.
    5. Bandara, Jayatilleke S, 1991. " Computable General Equilibrium Models for Development Policy Analysis in LDCs," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 5(1), pages 3-69.
    6. Shoven, John B & Whalley, John, 1984. "Applied General-Equilibrium Models of Taxation and International Trade: An Introduction and Survey," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 22(3), pages 1007-1051, September.
    7. Hans M. Amman & David A. Kendrick, . "Computational Economics," Online economics textbooks, SUNY-Oswego, Department of Economics, number comp1, March.
    8. Pereira, Alfredo M. & Shoven, John B., 1988. "Survey of dynamic computational general equilibrium models for tax policy evaluation," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 10(3), pages 401-436.
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    Cited by:

    1. Naranpanawa, Athula & Arora, Rashmi, 2014. "Does Trade Liberalization Promote Regional Disparities? Evidence from a Multiregional CGE Model of India," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 339-349.
    2. P. J. Forsyth, 1985. "Trade and Industry Policy," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 18(3), pages 70-81.
    3. J. David Richardson, 1989. "Empirical Research on Trade Liberalization With Imperfect Competition: A Survey," NBER Working Papers 2883, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Kaludura Abayasiri-Silva & Mark Horridge, 1996. "Economies of Scale and Imperfect Competition in an Applied General Equilibrium Model of the Australian Economy," Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre Working Papers op-84, Victoria University, Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre.

    More about this item


    Economies of scale; imperfect competition; applied general equilibrium models;

    JEL classification:

    • C68 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computable General Equilibrium Models
    • L11 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Production, Pricing, and Market Structure; Size Distribution of Firms
    • L13 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Oligopoly and Other Imperfect Markets


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