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Health Care and Health Outcomes of Migrants: Evidence from Portugal

  • Pedro Pita Barros

    ()

    (Departamento de Economia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa and CEPR)

  • Isabel Medalho Pereira

    ()

    (Human Development Report Office (UNDP) and CEFAGE-UE)

This paper studies the performance of immigrants relative to natives, in terms of their health status, use of health care services, lifestyles, and coverage of health expenditures. We base the analysis on international evidence that identified a healthy immigrant effect, complemented by empirical research on the Portuguese National Health Survey. Furthermore, we assess whether differences in health performance depend on the personal characteristics of the individuals or can be directly associated with their migration experience.

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File URL: http://www.cefage.uevora.pt/en/content/download/2050/28121/version/1/file/2010_04+.pdf
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Paper provided by University of Evora, CEFAGE-UE (Portugal) in its series CEFAGE-UE Working Papers with number 2010_04.

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Length: 67 pages
Date of creation: 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:cfe:wpcefa:2010_04
Contact details of provider: Postal: Colégio Espírito SANTO
Phone: (351) 266 740 869
Web page: http://www.cefage.uevora.pt
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  1. Timothy J. Halliday, 2008. "Heterogeneity, state dependence and health," Econometrics Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 11(3), pages 499-516, November.
  2. Guillermina Jasso & Douglas S. Massey & Mark R. Rosenzweig & James P. Smith, 2004. "Immigrant Health--Selectivity and Acculturation," Labor and Demography 0412002, EconWPA.
  3. Stillman, Steven & McKenzie, David & Gibson, John, 2007. "Migration and mental health : evidence from a natural experiment," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4138, The World Bank.
  4. Aïda Solé-Auró & Eileen M.Crimmins, 2008. "Health of Immigrants in European countries," IREA Working Papers 200809, University of Barcelona, Research Institute of Applied Economics, revised Jun 2008.
  5. Timothy J. Halliday & Michael Kimmitt, 2007. "Selective Migration and Health," Working Papers 200720, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Economics.
  6. Antecol, Heather & Bedard, Kelly, 2005. "Unhealthy Assimilation: Why Do Immigrants Converge to American Health Status Levels?," IZA Discussion Papers 1654, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  7. Booth, Alison L. & Carroll, Nick, 2005. "The Health Status of Indigenous and Non-Indigenous Australians," IZA Discussion Papers 1534, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  8. Hernández Quevedo, C & Jiménez Rubio, D, 2008. "A comparison of the health status and health care utilisation patterns between foreigners and the national population in Spain: new evidence from the Spanish National Health Survey," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 08/22, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
  9. Steven Kennedy & James Ted McDonald & Nicholas Biddle, 2006. "The Healthy Immigrant Effect and Immigrant Selection: Evidence from Four Countries," Social and Economic Dimensions of an Aging Population Research Papers 164, McMaster University.
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