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Stock Market Cycles and Supply Side Dynamics: Two Worlds, One Vision?

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  • Paul De Grauwe
  • Eddie Gerba

Abstract

The paper compares two state-of-art but very dinstinct methods used in macroeconomics: rational-expectations DSGE and bounded rationality behavioural models. Both models are extended to include a financial friction on the supply side.The result in both models is that production, supply of credit and the front payment to capital producers depend heavily on the stock market cycles. During phases of optimism, credit is abundant, access to production capital is easy, the cash-in-advance constraint is lax, the risks are undervalued, and production is booming. But upon reversal in market sentiment, the contraction in all these parameters is deeper and asymmetric. This is even more evident in the behavioural model, where cognitive limitations of economic agents result in exacerbation of the contraction. While both models capture the empirical regularities very well, the validation exercise is even more favourable to the behavioural model.

Suggested Citation

  • Paul De Grauwe & Eddie Gerba, 2015. "Stock Market Cycles and Supply Side Dynamics: Two Worlds, One Vision?," CESifo Working Paper Series 5573, CESifo Group Munich.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_5573
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    6. Paul Grauwe, 2011. "Animal spirits and monetary policy," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 47(2), pages 423-457, June.
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    10. Albonico, Alice & Kalyvitis, Sarantis & Pappa, Evi, 2014. "Capital maintenance and depreciation over the business cycle," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 273-286.
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    12. Gerba, Eddie, 2013. "Reconnecting investment to stock markets: the role of corporate net worth evaluation," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 56396, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Marko Petrovic & Bulent Ozel & Andrea Teglio & Marco Raberto & Silvano Cincotti, 2017. "Eurace Open: An agent-based multi-country model," Working Papers 2017/09, Economics Department, Universitat Jaume I, Castellón (Spain).
    2. Paul De Grauwe & Eddie Gerba, 2017. "Monetary transmission under competing corporate finance regimes," Revista ESPE - Ensayos sobre Política Económica, Banco de la Republica de Colombia, vol. 35(82), pages 78-100, April.
    3. de Grauwe, Paul & Gerba, Eddie, 2017. "Monetary transmission under competing corporate finance regimes = Transmisión monetaria bajo regímenes alternativos de finanzas corporativas," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 67658, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    4. Paul De Grauwe & Eddie Gerba, 2017. "Monetary transmission under competing corporate finance regimes," Ensayos sobre Política Económica, Banco de la Republica de Colombia, vol. 35(82), pages 46-55, April.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    supply-side; beliefs; financial frictions; model validations;

    JEL classification:

    • B41 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Economic Methodology - - - Economic Methodology
    • C63 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computational Techniques
    • C68 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computable General Equilibrium Models
    • E22 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Investment; Capital; Intangible Capital; Capacity
    • E23 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Production
    • E37 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications

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