IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/cep/cepdps/dp0326.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The Price is Right: Inflation and Nominal Wage Adjustment in Britain

Author

Listed:
  • D Brown
  • P Ingram
  • Jonathan Wadsworth

Abstract

How much changed regarding the wage employment relationship in Britain between 1979 and 1994, as the government tried to encourage greater wage and employment flexibility? This paper uses settlement group wage contact data to track the evolution of nominal wage settlements over time and examines the impact that inflation has on these outcomes. We show that dissegregated wage determination is consistent with a continuing disdain for nominal wage cuts on the part of both employees and employers. Paradoxically, price inflation, rather than institutional reform of the labour market may have done more to pormote real wage adjustment across establishments in Britain. During periods of high inflation, the distribution of manufacturing real wage settlements shifts to the left, resulting in an increase in the number if settlement groups who experience real wage cuts. High levels of inflation appear to be associated with lower real wage increases for a given shock. The correlation between real wages and subsequent employment adjustment appears to be very weak.

Suggested Citation

  • D Brown & P Ingram & Jonathan Wadsworth, 1997. "The Price is Right: Inflation and Nominal Wage Adjustment in Britain," CEP Discussion Papers dp0326, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  • Handle: RePEc:cep:cepdps:dp0326
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/DP0326.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Chew, Soo Hong, 1983. "A Generalization of the Quasilinear Mean with Applications to the Measurement of Income Inequality and Decision Theory Resolving the Allais Paradox," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 51(4), pages 1065-1092, July.
    2. Kravis, Irving B, 1984. "Comparative Studies of National Incomes and Prices," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 22(1), pages 1-39, March.
    3. Drechsler, Laszlo, 1973. "Weighting of Index Numbers in Multilateral International Comparisons," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 19(1), pages 17-34, March.
    4. Samuelson, Paul A, 1984. "Second Thoughts on Analytical Income Comparisons," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 94(374), pages 267-278, June.
    5. Prasada Rao, D S & Selvanathan, E Anthony & Pilat, Dirk, 1995. "Generalized Theil-Tornqvist Indices with Applications to International Comparisons of Prices and Real Output," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 77(2), pages 352-360, May.
    6. Samuelson, Paul A & Swamy, S, 1974. "Invariant Economic Index Numbers and Canonical Duality: Survey and Synthesis," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 64(4), pages 566-593, September.
    7. Caves, Douglas W & Christensen, Laurits R & Diewert, W Erwin, 1982. "Multilateral Comparisons of Output, Input, and Productivity Using Superlative Index Numbers," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 92(365), pages 73-86, March.
    8. Diewert, W. E., 1976. "Exact and superlative index numbers," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 4(2), pages 115-145, May.
    9. J. Peter Neary, 1996. "Theoretical foundations of the "Geary method" for international comparisons of purchasing power and real incomes," Working Papers 199603, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
    10. Marris, Robin, 1984. "Comparing the Incomes of Nations: A Critique of the International Comparison Project," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 22(1), pages 40-57, March.
    11. Robert Summers & Alan Heston, 1991. "The Penn World Table (Mark 5): An Expanded Set of International Comparisons, 1950–1988," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(2), pages 327-368.
    12. Samuelson, Paul A, 1994. "Facets of Balassa-Samuelson Thirty Years Later," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 2(3), pages 201-226, October.
    13. Deaton, Angus S & Muellbauer, John, 1980. "An Almost Ideal Demand System," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(3), pages 312-326, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Donna Brown & Peter Ingram & Jonathan Wadsworth, 2004. "Everyone's A Winner? Union Effects on Persistence in Private Sector Wage Settlements: Longitudinal Evidence from Britain," School of Economics Discussion Papers 1104, School of Economics, University of Surrey.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • R14 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Land Use Patterns
    • J01 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics: General

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cep:cepdps:dp0326. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/publications/series.asp?prog=CEP .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.