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Willingness to Pay For the Quality and Intensity of Medical Care: Evidence from Low Income Households in Ghana

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  • Lavy, Victor
  • Quigley, John M.

Abstract

This paper presents estimates of willingness to pay for medical care, including the quality and intensity of medical treatment sought in response to illness or injury. The empirical analysis is based on some 5000 observations on the behavior of low income households in Ghana in 1986. The results indicate that the decision to seek medical treatment is responsive to household income. Prices have significant but inelastic influences on the choice among types of treatment and the intensity of treatment sought. Availability of treatment has a substantial effect upon the types of treatment and the utilization of facilities. These results are robust to changes in the structure of the estimating model.

Suggested Citation

  • Lavy, Victor & Quigley, John M., 1991. "Willingness to Pay For the Quality and Intensity of Medical Care: Evidence from Low Income Households in Ghana," Berkeley Program on Housing and Urban Policy, Working Paper Series qt8237c6g3, Berkeley Program on Housing and Urban Policy.
  • Handle: RePEc:cdl:bphupl:qt8237c6g3
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    Cited by:

    1. Magnus Lindelow, 2004. "Understanding spatial variation in the utilization of health," Development and Comp Systems 0409058, EconWPA.
    2. Lindelow, Magnus, 2002. "Health care demand in rural Mozambique," FCND discussion papers 126, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Jimenez, Emmanuel & DEC, 1994. "Human and physical infrastructure : public investment and pricing policies in developing countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1281, The World Bank.
    4. Magnus Lindelow, 2004. "The Utilization of Curative Health Care in Mozambique: Does Income Matter?," Development and Comp Systems 0409057, EconWPA.
    5. Magnus Lindelow, 2003. "Understanding spatial variation in the utilization of health services: does quality matter?," Economics Series Working Papers WPS/2004-12, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    6. Lloyd Amaghionyeodiwe, 2008. "Determinants of the choice of health care provider in Nigeria," Health Care Management Science, Springer, vol. 11(3), pages 215-227, September.

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