IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Stuck on a Spoke: Proliferating Bilateral Trade Deals are a Dangerous Game for Canada


  • William B.P. Robson

    (C.D. Howe Institute)


Canada’s Minister of International Trade, David Emerson, heralded a free trade agreement with the European Free Trade Association in June by saying “Canada is back in the game.” In July, the government announced talks on free trade with Colombia, Peru and CARICOM (the Caribbean Community). While the new agreement is an overdue triumph over special interests, and western-hemisphere liberalization offers economic and political benefits, a broader view of trade policy shows that Canada has fallen behind — and is perhaps even playing in the wrong arena.

Suggested Citation

  • William B.P. Robson, 2007. "Stuck on a Spoke: Proliferating Bilateral Trade Deals are a Dangerous Game for Canada," e-briefs 47, C.D. Howe Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:cdh:ebrief:47

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Patrick Georges, 2009. "Dispensing with NAFTA Rules of Origin? Some Policy Options for Canada," Working Papers 0904E, University of Ottawa, Department of Economics.
    2. Patrick Georges, 2012. "Trade Diversification Away from the U.S. or North American Customs Union? A Review of Canada’s Trade Policy Options," Working Papers 1205E, University of Ottawa, Department of Economics.
    3. William B.P. Robson, 2008. "Safe Harbours: Providing Protection for Canada's Money-Purchase Plan Sponsors," C.D. Howe Institute Backgrounder, C.D. Howe Institute, issue 110, January.
    4. Yvan Guillemette & William B.P. Robson, 2007. "Realistic Expectations: Demographics and the Pursuit of Prosperity in Saskatchewan," C.D. Howe Institute Backgrounder, C.D. Howe Institute, issue 107, November.

    More about this item


    international policy; trade strategies; NAFTA;

    JEL classification:

    • F13 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Policy; International Trade Organizations
    • F15 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Economic Integration


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cdh:ebrief:47. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Kristine Gray). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.