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Human Resource Constraints for Electricity Regulation in Developing Countries: Has Anything Changed?

Author

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  • Pollitt, M.G.
  • Stern, J.

Abstract

We provide strong evidence that there are significant human resource constraints which limit the scale and, hence, the scope and potential effectiveness of electricity/energy regulatory agencies in developing countries. We summarise the key findings in our earlier Domah, Pollitt and Stern paper (2002). We then consider what new evidence there is on regulatory staffing levels since 2001/2002 and on the implications of high fixed costs for developing countries’ electricity and regulatory policies. Our conclusion is that little has changed over the intervening period.

Suggested Citation

  • Pollitt, M.G. & Stern, J., 2009. "Human Resource Constraints for Electricity Regulation in Developing Countries: Has Anything Changed?," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 0914, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
  • Handle: RePEc:cam:camdae:0914
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    File URL: http://www.econ.cam.ac.uk/research-files/repec/cam/pdf/cwpe0914.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Haney, Aoife Brophy & Pollitt, Michael G., 2009. "Efficiency analysis of energy networks: An international survey of regulators," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(12), pages 5814-5830, December.
    2. Berg, Sanford V., 2013. "Best practices in regulating State-owned and municipal water utilities," Documentos de Proyectos 542, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    electricity regulation; human resource constraints; developing countries.;

    JEL classification:

    • L30 - Industrial Organization - - Nonprofit Organizations and Public Enterprise - - - General
    • N40 - Economic History - - Government, War, Law, International Relations, and Regulation - - - General, International, or Comparative
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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