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Social Protection for the Poor and Poorest in Developing Countries: Reflections on a Quiet Revolution


  • Armando Barrientos
  • David Hulme


The concept and practice of social protection in developing countries has advanced at an astonishing pace over the last decade or so. There is a growing consensus around the view that social protection constitutes an effective response to poverty and vulnerability in developing countries, and an essential component of economic and social development strategies. This paper argues that the rise of social protection constitutes a response to global factors, but with considerable regional diversity. The paper examines the factors determining the future course of social protection and identifies urgent research needs.

Suggested Citation

  • Armando Barrientos & David Hulme, 2008. "Social Protection for the Poor and Poorest in Developing Countries: Reflections on a Quiet Revolution," Brooks World Poverty Institute Working Paper Series 3008, BWPI, The University of Manchester.
  • Handle: RePEc:bwp:bwppap:3008

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Dehejia, Rajeev & Montgomery, Heather & Morduch, Jonathan, 2012. "Do interest rates matter? Credit demand in the Dhaka slums," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 97(2), pages 437-449.
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    Cited by:

    1. Gentilini, Ugo & Omamo, Steven Were, 2011. "Social protection 2.0: Exploring issues, evidence and debates in a globalizing world," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(3), pages 329-340, June.
    2. repec:gam:jijfss:v:6:y:2018:i:1:p:16-:d:129793 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Miguel Nino-Zarazua, 2011. "Mexico’s Progresa-Oportunidades and the emergence of Social Assistance in Latin America," Brooks World Poverty Institute Working Paper Series 14211, BWPI, The University of Manchester.
    4. Cousins, Mel, 2014. "Social Protection in the Mekong: policy trends and future directions," MPRA Paper 60026, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Thomas Roca & Hélène Ferrer, 2016. "Resilience to crisis through social protection: Can we build the case?," WIDER Working Paper Series 096, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    6. Sepúlveda, Magdalena, 2014. "The rights-based approach to social protection in Latin America: From rhetoric to practice," Políticas Sociales 189, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL).
    7. Barrientos, Armando & Niño-Zarazúa, Miguel, 2011. "Social transfers and chronic poverty: objectives, design, reach and impact," MPRA Paper 30465, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. World Bank & Observatoire National de la Pauvreté et de l’Exclusion Sociale, 2014. "Investing in People to Fight Poverty in Haiti : Reflections for Evidence-based Policy Making
      [Haïti - Investir dans l’humain pour combattre la pauvreté : Éléments de réflexions pour la prise de déc
      ," World Bank Other Operational Studies 21519, The World Bank.

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