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Heterogeneous treatment-effect analysis

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  • Ben Jann

    (ETH Z├╝rich)

Abstract

Methods for causal inference and the estimation of treatment effects have received much attention in recent years. Most of the methodological and applied work focuses on the identification of so-called average treatment effects, possibly restricted to the treated or the untreated. However, treatment effects may vary (hence the averaging), and it can be interesting to analyze the patterns of effect heterogeneity. In this talk, I will present a new command called hte that is used for heterogeneous treatment-effect analysis in Stata. hte first constructs balanced propensity-score strata and, within each stratum, estimates the average treatment effect. hte then tests for a linear trend in effects across the strata. The stratum-specific treatment effects and the estimated linear trend are displayed in a two-way graph. hte results from joint work with Jennie E. Brand (UCLA) and Yu Xie (University of Michigan).

Suggested Citation

  • Ben Jann, 2010. "Heterogeneous treatment-effect analysis," German Stata Users' Group Meetings 2010 03, Stata Users Group.
  • Handle: RePEc:boc:dsug10:03
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    File URL: http://fmwww.bc.edu/repec/dsug2010/jann.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Jennie Brand & Dwight Davis, 2011. "The Impact of College Education on Fertility: Evidence for Heterogeneous Effects," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 48(3), pages 863-887, August.
    2. Anders Stenberg & Olle Westerlund, 2015. "The long-term earnings consequences of general vs. specific training of the unemployed," IZA Journal of European Labor Studies, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-26, December.
    3. Mutuc, Maria Erlinda M. & Rejesus, Roderick M. & Yorobe, Jose M., Jr., 2012. "Which Farmers Benefit the Most from Bt Corn Adoption in the Philippines? Estimating Heterogeneity Effects," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 126363, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    4. Anning Hu, 2014. "The Health Benefits of College Education in Urban China: Selection Bias and Heterogeneity," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 115(3), pages 1101-1121, February.

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