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Consumer Acceptance Of Gmo Cowpeas In Sub-Sahara Africa

Author

Listed:
  • Kushwaha, Saket
  • Musa, A.S.
  • Lowenberg-DeBoer, James
  • Fulton, Joan R.

Abstract

Cowpea is the most important indigenous African grain legume for both home use and as a cash crop. Because of its tolerance to drought it is especially important for the Sahel. Genetic transformation of cowpea with Bachilius Thurengius (Bt) genes to control pod boring insects has many advantages, but little is known of the potential consumer response. This paper analyzes and reports the results of a survey of 200 consumers in northern Nigeria in early 2003 concerning consumer awareness of and acceptance of biotechnology. Ninety percent of the respondents were aware of GM products. Those respondents who were most concerned about the ethics of genetic transformation were likely to disapprove of such products, while those individuals who identified international radio as an information source were more likely to approve of GM technology.

Suggested Citation

  • Kushwaha, Saket & Musa, A.S. & Lowenberg-DeBoer, James & Fulton, Joan R., 2004. "Consumer Acceptance Of Gmo Cowpeas In Sub-Sahara Africa," 2004 Annual meeting, August 1-4, Denver, CO 20216, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea04:20216
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.20216
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/20216/files/sp04ku01.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Langyintuo, Augustine S. & Lowenberg-DeBoer, James & Arndt, Channing, 2003. "Potential Impacts Of The Proposed West African Monetary Zone On Cowpea Trade In West And Central Africa," 2003 Annual meeting, July 27-30, Montreal, Canada 22236, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
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    Cited by:

    1. Bett, Charles & Ouma, James Okuro & Groote, Hugo De, 2010. "Perspectives of gatekeepers in the Kenyan food industry towards genetically modified food," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 332-340, August.
    2. Mariah D. Ehmke & Jayson L. Lusk & Wallace Tyner, 2008. "Measuring the relative importance of preferences for country of origin in China, France, Niger, and the United States," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 38(3), pages 277-285, May.

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