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Job Market Polarization and Employment Protection in Europe

  • Barbara Pertold-Gebicka


    (Department of Economics and Business, Aarhus University, Denmark)

Although much attention has been paid to the polarization of national labor markets, with employment and wage growth occurring in both low- and high- but not middle-skill occupations, there is little consistent evidence on cross-country differences in this process. I analyze job polarization in 12 European countries using an occupational skill-intensity measure, which is independent of country-specific labor supply conditions. Extensive cross-country differences in the extent of polarization correspond to variation in economic conditions and to dissimilarities in the employment protection legislation.

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Paper provided by School of Economics and Management, University of Aarhus in its series Economics Working Papers with number 2012-13.

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Length: 25
Date of creation: 06 Jun 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:aah:aarhec:2012-13
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  1. Robert J. Barro, 2012. "Inflation and Economic Growth," CEMA Working Papers 568, China Economics and Management Academy, Central University of Finance and Economics.
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  9. Maza, Adolfo & Hierro, María & Villaverde, José, 2012. "Income distribution dynamics across European regions: Re-examining the role of space," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 2632-2640.
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