IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this book chapter

The Evolution of Geographic Structure in New Industries

In: Applied Evolutionary Economics and Economic Geography


  • Steven Klepper


Applied Evolutionary Economics and Economic Geography aims to further advance empirical methodologies in evolutionary economics, with a special emphasis on geography and firm location. It does so by bringing together a select group of leading scholars including economists, geographers and sociologists, all of whom share an interest in explaining the uneven distribution of economic activities in space and the historical processes that have produced these patterns.

Suggested Citation

  • Steven Klepper, 2007. "The Evolution of Geographic Structure in New Industries," Chapters,in: Applied Evolutionary Economics and Economic Geography, chapter 4 Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:4172_4

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Guido Buenstorf & Steven Klepper, 2009. "Heritage and Agglomeration: The Akron Tyre Cluster Revisited," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 119(537), pages 705-733, April.
    2. Guy Dumais & Glenn Ellison & Edward L. Glaeser, 2002. "Geographic Concentration As A Dynamic Process," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 84(2), pages 193-204, May.
    3. Figueiredo, Octavio & Guimaraes, Paulo & Woodward, Douglas, 2002. "Home-field advantage: location decisions of Portuguese entrepreneurs," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(2), pages 341-361, September.
    4. Stefano Breschi & Francesco Lissoni, 2003. "Mobility and Social Networks: Localised Knowledge Spillovers Revisited," KITeS Working Papers 142, KITeS, Centre for Knowledge, Internationalization and Technology Studies, Universita' Bocconi, Milano, Italy, revised Mar 2003.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Breul Moritz & Broekel Tom & Brachert Matthias, 2015. "Die Treiber der räumlichen Emergenz und Konzentration der Photovoltaik- Industrie in Deutschland," Zeitschrift für Wirtschaftsgeographie, De Gruyter, vol. 59(3), pages 133-150, December.
    2. Thomas Brenner & Matthias Duschl, 2014. "Modelling Firm and Market Dynamics - A Flexible Model Reproducing Existing Stylized Facts," Working Papers on Innovation and Space 2014-07, Philipps University Marburg, Department of Geography.
    3. Tobias Scholl & Thomas Brenner & Martin Wendel, 2016. "Evolving localization patterns of company foundationsEvidence from the German MST-industry," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 26(5), pages 1067-1087, December.
    4. Tobias Scholl & Thomas Brenner & Martin Wendel, 2012. "Evolving localization patterns of company foundations - Evidence from the German MST-industry," Working Papers on Innovation and Space 2012-05, Philipps University Marburg, Department of Geography.
    5. Strambach Simone & Halkier Henrik, 2013. "Editorial. Reconceptualizing change," Zeitschrift für Wirtschaftsgeographie, De Gruyter, vol. 57(1-2), pages 1-14, October.
    6. Gil Avnimelech & Morris Teubal, 2010. "The Co-evolution of ICT, VC and Policy in Israel During the 1990s," Chapters,in: Emerging Clusters, chapter 6 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    7. Järvinen, Joonas & Lamberg, Juha-Antti & Pietinalho, Lauri, 2012. "The fall and the fragmentation of national clusters: Cluster evolution in the paper and pulp industry," Journal of Forest Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 218-241.
    8. Guido Buenstorf & Christina Guenther, 2007. "No place like home? Location choice and firm survival after forced relocation in the German machine tool industry," Jena Economic Research Papers 2007-053, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
    9. Thomas Brenner & André Mühlig, 2007. "Factors and Mechanisms Causing the Emergence of Local Industrial Clusters - A Meta-Study of 159 Cases," Papers on Economics and Evolution 2007-23, Philipps University Marburg, Department of Geography.
    10. Ron Boschma, 2015. "Do spinoff dynamics or agglomeration externalities drive industry clustering? A reappraisal of Steven Klepper’s work," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 24(4), pages 859-873.
    11. Brenner Thomas, 2008. "Cluster dynamics and policy implications," Zeitschrift für Wirtschaftsgeographie, De Gruyter, vol. 52(1), pages 146-162, October.
    12. Gabriela Dutrénit & Morris Teubal, 2011. "Coevolution, Emergence and Economic Development: Some Lessons from the Israeli and Mexican Experience," Chapters,in: Handbook on the Economic Complexity of Technological Change, chapter 18 Edward Elgar Publishing.

    More about this item


    Economics and Finance; Environment; Geography; Innovations and Technology;

    JEL classification:

    • L65 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Manufacturing - - - Chemicals; Rubber; Drugs; Biotechnology; Plastics
    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)
    • R30 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Real Estate Markets, Spatial Production Analysis, and Firm Location - - - General


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:4172_4. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Darrel McCalla). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.