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The Obscure Firm in the Wealth of Nations

In: Handbook on the Economics and Theory of the Firm

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  • Michael Best

Abstract

This unique Handbook explores both the economics of the firm and the theory of the firm, two areas which are traditionally treated separately in the literature. On the one hand, the former refers to the structure, organization and boundaries of the firm, while the latter is devoted to the analysis of behaviours and strategies in particular market contexts. The novel concept underpinning this authoritative volume is that these two areas closely interact, and that a framework must be articulated in order to illustrate how linkages can be created.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael Best, 2012. "The Obscure Firm in the Wealth of Nations," Chapters, in: Michael Dietrich & Jackie Krafft (ed.),Handbook on the Economics and Theory of the Firm, chapter 2, Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:13623_2
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    File URL: https://www.elgaronline.com/view/9781848446489.00009.xml
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jean-Louis Peaucelle, 2006. "Adam Smith's use of multiple references for his pin making example," The European Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(4), pages 489-512.
    2. Kuznets, Simon, 1973. "Modern Economic Growth: Findings and Reflections," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 63(3), pages 247-258, June.
    3. Abramovitz, Moses, 1986. "Catching Up, Forging Ahead, and Falling Behind," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 46(2), pages 385-406, June.
    4. John Finch, 2000. "Is post-Marshallian economics an evolutionary research tradition?," The European Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(3), pages 377-406.
    5. George J. Stigler, 1951. "The Division of Labor is Limited by the Extent of the Market," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 59, pages 185-185.
    6. Loasby, Brian J, 1999. "The Significance of Penrose's Theory for the Development of Economics," Contributions to Political Economy, Oxford University Press, vol. 18(0), pages 31-45.
    7. Best, Michael, 2001. "The New Competitive Advantage: The Renewal of American Industry," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198297451.
    8. Abramovitz, Moses, 1993. "The Search for the Sources of Growth: Areas of Ignorance, Old and New," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 53(2), pages 217-243, June.
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