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Jim Sentance

Personal Details

First Name:Jim
Middle Name:
Last Name:Sentance
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pse255
Twitter: @sentancej

Affiliation

Department of Economics
University of Prince Edward Island

Charlottetown, Canada
http://www.upei.ca/~economic/

: (902) 566-0326
(902) 566-0302
Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, C1A 4P3
RePEc:edi:depeica (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

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Jump to: Articles

Articles

  1. Ronald Meng & Jim Sentance, 1984. "Religion and the Determination of Earnings: Further Results," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 17(3), pages 481-488, August.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Articles

  1. Ronald Meng & Jim Sentance, 1984. "Religion and the Determination of Earnings: Further Results," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 17(3), pages 481-488, August.

    Cited by:

    1. Sumon Kumar Bhaumik & Manisha Chakrabarty, 2007. "Is Education the Panacea for Economic Deprivation of Muslims? Evidence from Wage Earners in India, 1987-2004," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series wp858, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    2. Ahmed, Salma, 2015. "Dynamics and diversity: How are religious minorities faring in the labour Market in Bangladesh?," MPRA Paper 75153, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 18 Nov 2016.
    3. Donna K. Ginther & Madeline Zavodny, 2001. "Is the male marriage premium due to selection? The effect of shotgun weddings on the return to marriage," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 14(2), pages 313-328.
    4. Maryam Dilmaghani, 2017. "Religiosity and Labour Earnings in Canadian Provinces," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 38(1), pages 82-99, March.
    5. Bhaumik, Sumon K. & Chakrabarty, Manisha, 2007. "Is Education the Panacea for Economic Deprivation of Muslims? Evidence from Wage Earners in India, 1987–2005," IZA Discussion Papers 3232, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Michael A. Kortt & Brian Dollery & Bligh Grant, 2013. "The Relationship Between Religious Affiliation and Returns to Human Capital for Women," Economic Papers, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 32(3), pages 395-404, September.
    7. Arano, Kathleen G. & Blair, Benjamin F., 2008. "Modeling religious behavior and economic outcome: Is the relationship bicausal?: Evidence from a survey of Mississippi households," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 37(5), pages 2043-2053, October.
    8. Heath, W. C. & Waters, M. S. & Watson, J. K., 1995. "Religion and economic welfare: An empirical analysis of state per capita income," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 129-142, June.

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