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Ross Macmillan

Personal Details

First Name:Ross
Middle Name:
Last Name:Macmillan
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pma1729

Affiliation

"Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA)
Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi

Milano, Italy
http://www.dondena.unibocconi.it/

:


RePEc:edi:dobocit (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

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Jump to: Articles

Articles

  1. Boardman, Jason D. & Alexander, Kari B. & Miech, Richard A. & MacMillan, Ross & Shanahan, Michael J., 2012. "The association between parent’s health and the educational attainment of their children," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(5), pages 932-939.
  2. Bauldry, Shawn & Shanahan, Michael J. & Boardman, Jason D. & Miech, Richard A. & Macmillan, Ross, 2012. "A life course model of self-rated health through adolescence and young adulthood," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(7), pages 1311-1320.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Articles

  1. Boardman, Jason D. & Alexander, Kari B. & Miech, Richard A. & MacMillan, Ross & Shanahan, Michael J., 2012. "The association between parent’s health and the educational attainment of their children," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(5), pages 932-939.

    Cited by:

    1. Boardman, Jason D. & Domingue, Benjamin W. & Daw, Jonathan, 2015. "What can genes tell us about the relationship between education and health?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 127(C), pages 171-180.
    2. von Hippel, Paul T. & Lynch, Jamie L., 2014. "Why are educated adults slim—Causation or selection?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 105(C), pages 131-139.

  2. Bauldry, Shawn & Shanahan, Michael J. & Boardman, Jason D. & Miech, Richard A. & Macmillan, Ross, 2012. "A life course model of self-rated health through adolescence and young adulthood," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(7), pages 1311-1320.

    Cited by:

    1. Le, Huong & Nguyen, Ha, 2015. "Intergenerational transmission in health: Causal estimates from fixed effects instrumental variables models for two cohorts of Australian children," MPRA Paper 68175, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Schaan, Barbara, 2014. "The interaction of family background and personal education on depressive symptoms in later life," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 94-102.
    3. Goosby, Bridget J. & Cheadle, Jacob E. & McDade, Thomas, 2016. "Birth weight, early life course BMI, and body size change: Chains of risk to adult inflammation?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 148(C), pages 102-109.
    4. Naomi Duke & Ross Macmillan, 2016. "Schooling, skills, and self-rated health: A test of conventional wisdom on the relationship between educational attainment and health," Working Papers 087, "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi.
    5. Bauldry, Shawn, 2014. "Conditional health-related benefits of higher education: An assessment of compensatory versus accumulative mechanisms," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 111(C), pages 94-100.
    6. Vie, Tina Løkke & Hufthammer, Karl Ove & Holmen, Turid Lingaas & Meland, Eivind & Breidablik, Hans Johan, 2014. "Is self-rated health a stable and predictive factor for allostatic load in early adulthood? Findings from the Nord Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT)," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 117(C), pages 1-9.
    7. Link, Bruce G. & Susser, Ezra S. & Factor-Litvak, Pam & March, Dana & Kezios, Katrina L. & Lovasi, Gina S. & Rundle, Andrew G. & Suglia, Shakira F. & Fader, Kim M. & Andrews, Howard F. & Johnson, Eile, 2017. "Disparities in self-rated health across generations and through the life course," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 174(C), pages 17-25.

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