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Shirley H. Liu

Personal Details

First Name:Shirley
Middle Name:H.
Last Name:Liu
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pli270
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
http://moya.bus.miami.edu/~sliu
Terminal Degree:2004 Economics Department; Stony Brook University - SUNY (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Department of Economics
School of Business
University of Miami

Coral Gables, Florida (United States)
http://www.bus.miami.edu/thought-leadership/academic-departments/economics/

: (305) 284-5540
(305) 284-2985
P.O. Box 248126, Coral Gables, FL 33124-6550
RePEc:edi:demiaus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Shirley H. Liu, 2007. "Is My Parents' Divorce to Blame for My Failure in Life? A joint Model of Child Educational Attainments and Parental Divorce," Working Papers 0610, University of Miami, Department of Economics.
  2. Shirley H. Liu & Frank Heiland, 2007. "Should We Get Married? The Effect of Parents’ Marriage on Out-of-Wedlock Children," Working Papers 0611, University of Miami, Department of Economics.
  3. Shirley H. Liu & Frank Heiland, 2007. "New Estimates on the Effect of Parental Separation on Child Health," Working Papers 0719, University of Miami, Department of Economics.
  4. Frank Heiland & Shirley H. Liu, 2005. "Family Structure and Wellbeing of Out-of-Wedlock Children: The Significance of the Biological Parents' Relationship," Working Papers 0612, University of Miami, Department of Economics, revised Sep 2006.

Articles

  1. Shirley H. Liu & Frank Heiland, 2012. "Should We Get Married? The Effect Of Parents' Marriage On Out‐Of‐Wedlock Children," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 50(1), pages 17-38, January.
  2. Frank W. Heiland & Shirley H. Liu, 2006. "Family structure and wellbeing of out-of-wedlock children," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 15(4), pages 61-104, September.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Shirley H. Liu, 2007. "Is My Parents' Divorce to Blame for My Failure in Life? A joint Model of Child Educational Attainments and Parental Divorce," Working Papers 0610, University of Miami, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Proto, Eugenio & Sgroi, Daniel & Oswald, Andrew J., 2010. "Are Happiness and Productivity Lower among University Students with Newly-Divorced Parents? An Experimental Approach," IZA Discussion Papers 4755, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

  2. Shirley H. Liu & Frank Heiland, 2007. "Should We Get Married? The Effect of Parents’ Marriage on Out-of-Wedlock Children," Working Papers 0611, University of Miami, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Kwok Chan & Ka Fung & Ender Demir, 2015. "The health and behavioral outcomes of out-of-wedlock children from families of social fathers," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 13(2), pages 385-411, June.
    2. Kasey S. Buckles & Melanie E. Guldi & Joseph Price, 2009. "Changing the Price of Marriage: Evidence from Blood Test Requirements," NBER Working Papers 15161, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Keith Finlay & David Neumark, 2010. "Is Marriage Always Good for Children?: Evidence from Families Affected by Incarceration," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 45(4), pages 1046-1088.
    4. Chan, Kwok Ho & Fung, Ka Wai Terence, 2013. "The Effect of Social Fathers on the Cognitive Skills of Out-of-Wedlock Children," MPRA Paper 52875, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Chan, Kwok Ho & Fung, Ka Wai Terence, 2018. "The effect of social fathers on the cognitive skills of out-of-wedlock children in the U.S," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 146-159.
    6. Helgertz, Jonas & Vågerö, Denny, 2014. "Small for gestational age and adulthood risk of disability pension: The contribution of childhood and adulthood conditions," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 119(C), pages 249-257.
    7. Sharon H. Bzostek & Lawrence M. Berger, 2017. "Family Structure Experiences and Child Socioemotional Development During the First Nine Years of Life: Examining Heterogeneity by Family Structure at Birth," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 54(2), pages 513-540, April.
    8. Shirley H. Liu & Frank Heiland, 2007. "New Estimates on the Effect of Parental Separation on Child Health," Working Papers 0719, University of Miami, Department of Economics.

  3. Shirley H. Liu & Frank Heiland, 2007. "New Estimates on the Effect of Parental Separation on Child Health," Working Papers 0719, University of Miami, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

  4. Frank Heiland & Shirley H. Liu, 2005. "Family Structure and Wellbeing of Out-of-Wedlock Children: The Significance of the Biological Parents' Relationship," Working Papers 0612, University of Miami, Department of Economics, revised Sep 2006.

    Cited by:

    1. Elena Mariani & Berkay Özcan & Alice Goisis, 2017. "Family Trajectories and Well-being of Children Born to Lone Mothers in the UK," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 33(2), pages 185-215, May.
    2. Sar, Bibhuti K. & Antle, Becky F. & Bledsoe, Linda K. & Barbee, Anita P. & Van Zyl, Michiel A., 2010. "The importance of expanding home visitation services to include strengthening family relationships for the benefit of children," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 198-205, February.
    3. Schmeer, Kammi, 2009. "Father absence due to migration and child illness in rural Mexico," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 69(8), pages 1281-1286, October.
    4. Shirley H. Liu & Frank Heiland, 2007. "Should We Get Married? The Effect of Parents’ Marriage on Out-of-Wedlock Children," Working Papers 0611, University of Miami, Department of Economics.
    5. Jessica Su & Rachel Dunifon & Sharon Sassler, 2015. "Better for Baby? The Retreat From Mid-Pregnancy Marriage and Implications for Parenting and Child Well-being," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 52(4), pages 1167-1194, August.
    6. Frans Poppel & Niels Schenk & Ruben Gaalen, 2013. "Demographic Transitions and Changes in the Living Arrangements of Children: The Netherlands 1850–2010," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 32(2), pages 243-260, April.

Articles

  1. Shirley H. Liu & Frank Heiland, 2012. "Should We Get Married? The Effect Of Parents' Marriage On Out‐Of‐Wedlock Children," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 50(1), pages 17-38, January.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Frank W. Heiland & Shirley H. Liu, 2006. "Family structure and wellbeing of out-of-wedlock children," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 15(4), pages 61-104, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Mir Ali & Olugbenga Ajilore, 2011. "Can Marriage Reduce Risky Health Behavior for African-Americans?," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 32(2), pages 191-203, June.
    2. Shirley H. Liu & Frank Heiland, 2007. "Should We Get Married? The Effect of Parents’ Marriage on Out-of-Wedlock Children," Working Papers 0611, University of Miami, Department of Economics.
    3. Shirley H. Liu & Frank Heiland, 2007. "New Estimates on the Effect of Parental Separation on Child Health," Working Papers 0719, University of Miami, Department of Economics.

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