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Kofi Kamasa

Personal Details

First Name:Kofi
Middle Name:
Last Name:Kamasa
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pka1391
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]

Affiliation

Faculty of Integrated Management Science
University of Mines and Technology

Tarkwa, Ghana
https://www.umat.edu.gh/index.php/academics/navigations/fims




RePEc:edi:fiumtgh (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

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Jump to: Articles

Articles

  1. Isaac Bonuedi & Kofi Kamasa & Eric Evans Osei Opoku, 2020. "Enabling trade across borders and food security in Africa," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 12(5), pages 1121-1140, October.
  2. Afful, Solomon Luther & Kamasa, Kofi, 2020. "Interest Rate and its Threshold Effect on Private Investment: Evidence from Ghana," African Journal of Economic Review, African Journal of Economic Review, vol. 8(2), July.
  3. Kamasa, Kofi & Adu, George & Oteng-Abayie, Eric Fosu, 2019. "Tax Compliance in Sub-Saharan Africa: How Important are Non-Pecuniary Factors?," African Journal of Economic Review, African Journal of Economic Review, vol. 7(1), January.
  4. Isaac Bonuedi & Kofi Kamasa & Elliot Boateng, 2019. "The Growth Effects of the Bulging Economically Active Population in Sub‐Saharan Africa: Do Institutions Matter?," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 31(1), pages 71-86, March.
  5. Kofi Kamasa & George Adu & Eric Fosu Oteng-Abayie, 2019. "Firm productivity in Sub-Saharan Africa: how relevant is quality of tax administration?," African Journal of Economic and Management Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 11(1), pages 75-90, November.
  6. Kofi Kamasa & Grace Ofori-Abebrese, 2015. "Wagner or Keynes for Ghana? Government Expenditure and Economic Growth Dynamics. A ‘VAR’ Approach," Journal of Reviews on Global Economics, Lifescience Global, vol. 4, pages 177-183.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Articles

  1. Kamasa, Kofi & Adu, George & Oteng-Abayie, Eric Fosu, 2019. "Tax Compliance in Sub-Saharan Africa: How Important are Non-Pecuniary Factors?," African Journal of Economic Review, African Journal of Economic Review, vol. 7(1), January.

    Cited by:

    1. Oluwafadekemi S. Areo & Obindah Gershon & Evans Osabuohien, 2020. "Improved Public Services and Tax Compliance of Small and Medium Scale Enterprises in Nigeria: A Generalised Ordered Logistic Regression," Asian Economic and Financial Review, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 10(7), pages 833-860, July.

  2. Isaac Bonuedi & Kofi Kamasa & Elliot Boateng, 2019. "The Growth Effects of the Bulging Economically Active Population in Sub‐Saharan Africa: Do Institutions Matter?," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 31(1), pages 71-86, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Boateng, Elliot & Agbola, Frank W. & Mahmood, Amir, 2021. "Foreign aid volatility and economic growth in Sub-Saharan Africa: Does institutional quality matter?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 96(C), pages 111-127.
    2. Gameli Adika, 2020. "Economic growth dynamics between resource‐rich and resource‐poor countries in sub‐Saharan Africa: The role of politics and institutions," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 32(3), pages 303-315, September.
    3. Muhammad Tahir & Munshi Naser Ibne Afzal & Muhammad Asim Afridi & Imran Naseem & Bilal Bin Saeed, 2019. "Terrorism and its Determinants in the Sub‐Saharan Africa Region: Some New Insights," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 31(3), pages 393-406, September.
    4. Olayemi M. Olabiyi, 2020. "Electoral participation and household food insecurity in sub‐Saharan Africa," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 32(3), pages 392-403, September.

  3. Kofi Kamasa & Grace Ofori-Abebrese, 2015. "Wagner or Keynes for Ghana? Government Expenditure and Economic Growth Dynamics. A ‘VAR’ Approach," Journal of Reviews on Global Economics, Lifescience Global, vol. 4, pages 177-183.

    Cited by:

    1. Wahyudi Wahyudi, 2020. "The Relationship between Government Spending and Economic Growth Revisited," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 10(6), pages 84-88.
    2. Omoshoro-Jones, Oyeyinka Sunday, 2016. "A Cointegration and Causality Test on Government Expenditure –Economic Growth Nexus: Empirical Evidence from a South African Province," MPRA Paper 102085, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 17 Oct 2017.
    3. Paul, Fintan & Furahisha, Godlove, 2017. "Government Expenditure and Economic Growth Nexus: Wagner’s law or Keynesian Hypothesis for Tanzania?," African Journal of Economic Review, African Journal of Economic Review, vol. 5(1), January.

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