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Katrin Gottschalk

Personal Details

First Name:Katrin
Middle Name:
Last Name:Gottschalk
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pgo211
http://www.aut.ac.nz/study-at-aut/study-areas/business/research/research-areas/listings/finance/katrin-gottschalk
Auckland University of Technology Business School Private Bag 92006 Auckland 1142 New Zealand
+64-9-9219999-5707

Affiliation

(in no particular order)

Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät (Faculty of Business Administration)
Europa-Universität Viadrina Frankfurt (Oder) (Viadrina Europe University of Frankfurt)

Frankfurt an der Oder, Germany
https://www.wiwi.europa-uni.de/

+49 (0)335 5534 2387
+49 (0)335 5534 2516
Grosse Scharrnstrasse 59, 15230 Frankfurt (Oder)
RePEc:edi:fwffode (more details at EDIRC)

Faculty of Business, Economics and Law
Auckland University of Technology

Auckland, New Zealand
http://www.aut.ac.nz/study-at-aut/faculty-of-business-and-law

+64 9 917-9721
+64 9 917-9976
Commerce House, 360 Queen Street, Private Bag 92006, Auckland 1020
RePEc:edi:fbautnz (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Bialkowski, Jedrzej & Gottschalk, Katrin & Wisniewski, Tomasz, 2006. "Stock market volatiltity around national elections," MPRA Paper 302, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Nov 2006.
  2. Bialkowski, Jedrzej & Gottschalk, Katrin & Wisniewski, Tomasz, 2006. "Political orientation of government and stock market returns," MPRA Paper 307, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Nov 2006.
  3. Bohl, Martin T. & Gottschalk, Katrin & Pál, Rozália, 2006. "Institutional investors and stock market efficiency: The case of the January anomaly," MPRA Paper 677, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Nov 2006.

Articles

  1. Bialkowski, Jedrzej & Gottschalk, Katrin & Wisniewski, Tomasz Piotr, 2008. "Stock market volatility around national elections," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 32(9), pages 1941-1953, September.
  2. Jedrzej Bialkowski & Katrin Gottschalk & Tomasz Piotr Wisniewski, 2007. "Political orientation of government and stock market returns," Applied Financial Economics Letters, Taylor and Francis Journals, vol. 3(4), pages 269-273.
  3. Bohl, Martin T. & Gottschalk, Katrin, 2006. "International evidence on the Democrat premium and the presidential cycle effect," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 107-120, August.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Bialkowski, Jedrzej & Gottschalk, Katrin & Wisniewski, Tomasz, 2006. "Stock market volatiltity around national elections," MPRA Paper 302, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Nov 2006.

    Cited by:

    1. Wisniewski, Tomasz Piotr, 2016. "Is there a link between politics and stock returns? A literature survey," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 15-23.
    2. John Goodell & Richard Bodey, 2012. "Price-earnings changes during US presidential election cycles: voter uncertainty and other determinants," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 150(3), pages 633-650, March.
    3. Krieger, Kevin & Mauck, Nathan & Vazquez, Joseph, 2015. "Comparing U.S. and European market volatility responses to interest rate policy announcements," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 127-136.
    4. Antonakakis, Nikolaos & Gupta, Rangan & Kollias, Christos & Papadamou, Stephanos, 2017. "Geopolitical risks and the oil-stock nexus over 1899–2016," Finance Research Letters, Elsevier, vol. 23(C), pages 165-173.
    5. Charles, Amélie & Darné, Olivier, 2014. "Large shocks in the volatility of the Dow Jones Industrial Average index: 1928–2013," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 188-199.
    6. Essaddam, Naceur & Karagianis, John M., 2014. "Terrorism, country attributes, and the volatility of stock returns," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 87-100.
    7. Syed Hassan & Sarosh Shabi & Taufiq Choudhry, 2018. "Asymmetry, Uncertainty and International Trade," Working Papers 2018-24, Swansea University, School of Management.
    8. Hartwell, Christopher A., 2014. "The impact of institutional volatility on financial volatility in transition economies : a GARCH family approach," BOFIT Discussion Papers 6/2014, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
    9. Gungoraydinoglu, Ali & Çolak, Gönül & Öztekin, Özde, 2017. "Political environment, financial intermediation costs, and financing patterns," Journal of Corporate Finance, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 167-192.
    10. Lee, Chien-Chiang & Lee, Chi-Chuan & Zeng, Jhih-Hong & Hsu, Yu-Ling, 2017. "Peer bank behavior, economic policy uncertainty, and leverage decision of financial institutions," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 79-91.
    11. Roman Kozhan, 2006. "Multiple Priors and No-Transaction Region," Working Papers wpn06-16, Warwick Business School, Finance Group.
    12. Christos Kollias & Stephanos Papadamou, 2012. "Rogue State Behavior and Markets: The Financial Fallout of North Korean Nuclear Tests," Economics of Security Working Paper Series 67, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    13. Tammuz Alraheb & Amine Tarazi, 2017. "Local Versus International Crises, Foreign Subsidiaries and Bank Stability: Evidence from the MENA Region," Post-Print hal-01558246, HAL.
    14. MORIKAWA Masayuki, 2013. "What Type of Policy Uncertainty Matters for Business?," Discussion papers 13076, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    15. Jens, Candace E., 2017. "Political uncertainty and investment: Causal evidence from U.S. gubernatorial elections," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 124(3), pages 563-579.
    16. Naoki Yasuda & Hitoshi Mitsuhashi, 2017. "Learning from Political Change and the Development of MNCs’ Political Capabilities: Evidence from the Global Mining Industry," Management International Review, Springer, vol. 57(5), pages 749-774, October.
    17. Oleg Badunenko & Michael Fritsch & Andreas Stephan, 2006. "Allocative Efficiency Measurement Revisited: Do We Really Need Input Prices?," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 591, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    18. Bourdeau-Brien, Michael & Kryzanowski, Lawrence, 2017. "The impact of natural disasters on the stock returns and volatilities of local firms," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 259-270.
    19. Goodell, John W. & Vähämaa, Sami, 2013. "US presidential elections and implied volatility: The role of political uncertainty," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 1108-1117.
    20. Bryan T. Kelly & Lubos Pastor & Pietro Veronesi, 2014. "The Price of Political Uncertainty: Theory and Evidence from the Option Market," Working Papers 2014-001, Becker Friedman Institute for Research In Economics.
    21. Mnasri, Ayman & Nechi, Salem, 2016. "Impact of terrorist attacks on stock market volatility in emerging markets," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 184-202.
    22. Tielmann, Artur & Schiereck, Dirk, 2017. "Arising borders and the value of logistic companies: Evidence from the Brexit referendum in Great Britain," Finance Research Letters, Elsevier, vol. 20(C), pages 22-28.
    23. Julio, Brandon & Yook, Youngsuk, 2016. "Policy uncertainty, irreversibility, and cross-border flows of capital," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 103(C), pages 13-26.
    24. Civilize, Sireethorn & Wongchoti, Udomsak & Young, Martin, 2015. "Military regimes and stock market performance," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(C), pages 76-95.
    25. Hasan AYAYDIN & Savaþ DURMUÞ, 2016. "Interest rate and Economic Growth as Determinants of Firm Investment Decision: An Investigation on BIST listed firms," Journal of Economics and Political Economy, KSP Journals, vol. 3(1), pages 160-169, March.
    26. Wisniewski, Tomasz Piotr & Lambe, Brendan John, 2015. "Does economic policy uncertainty drive CDS spreads?," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 447-458.
    27. Yun Zhu, 2015. "Political uncertainty and non-pricing terms of financial contract," Eurasian Economic Review, Springer;Eurasia Business and Economics Society, vol. 5(1), pages 77-109, June.
    28. Wisniewski, Tomasz P. & Pathan, Saima K., 2014. "Political environment and foreign direct investment: Evidence from OECD countries," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 13-23.
    29. Jedrzej Bialkowski & Katrin Gottschalk & Tomasz Piotr Wisniewski, 2007. "Political orientation of government and stock market returns," Applied Financial Economics Letters, Taylor and Francis Journals, vol. 3(4), pages 269-273.
    30. Smales, Lee A., 2014. "Political uncertainty and financial market uncertainty in an Australian context," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 415-435.
    31. Masayuki Morikawa, 2016. "What Types of Policy Uncertainties Matter for Business?," Pacific Economic Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 21(5), pages 527-540, December.
    32. Julia Darby & Graeme Roy, 2017. "Political uncertainty and stock market volatility: new evidence from the 2014 Scottish Independence Referendum," Working Papers 1706, University of Strathclyde Business School, Department of Economics.
    33. Lehkonen, Heikki & Heimonen, Kari, 2015. "Democracy, political risks and stock market performance," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 77-99.
    34. K. Arin & Alexander Molchanov & Otto Reich, 2013. "Politics, stock markets, and model uncertainty," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 45(1), pages 23-38, August.
    35. Choudhry, Taufiq, 2010. "World War II events and the Dow Jones industrial index," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 34(5), pages 1022-1031, May.
    36. Liu, Jinyu & Zhong, Rui, 2017. "Political uncertainty and a firm's credit risk: Evidence from the international CDS market," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 53-66.
    37. Goodell, John W. & McGroarty, Frank & Urquhart, Andrew, 2015. "Political uncertainty and the 2012 US presidential election: A cointegration study of prediction markets, polls and a stand-out expert," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 162-171.
    38. Ahmed, Walid M.A., 2017. "The impact of foreign equity flows on market volatility during politically tranquil and turbulent times: The Egyptian experience," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 61-77.
    39. Lee A. Smales, 2017. "“Brexit”: A Case Study in the Relationship Between Political and Financial Market Uncertainty," International Review of Finance, International Review of Finance Ltd., vol. 17(3), pages 451-459, September.
    40. Kollias, Christos & Kyrtsou, Catherine & Papadamou, Stephanos, 2013. "The effects of terrorism and war on the oil price–stock index relationship," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 743-752.
    41. Lau, Chi Keung Marco & Demir, Ender & Bilgin, Mehmet Huseyin, 2013. "Experience-based corporate corruption and stock market volatility: Evidence from emerging markets," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 17(C), pages 1-13.
    42. Galema, Rients & Plantinga, Auke & Scholtens, Bert, 2008. "The stocks at stake: Return and risk in socially responsible investment," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 32(12), pages 2646-2654, December.
    43. Sun, Changyou & Rahman, Mohammad M. & Munn, Ian A., 2013. "Adjustment of stock prices and volatility to changes in industrial timberland ownership," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(C), pages 91-101.
    44. Smales, Lee A., 2015. "Better the devil you know: The influence of political incumbency on Australian financial market uncertainty," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 59-74.

  2. Bialkowski, Jedrzej & Gottschalk, Katrin & Wisniewski, Tomasz, 2006. "Political orientation of government and stock market returns," MPRA Paper 307, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Nov 2006.

    Cited by:

    1. Wisniewski, Tomasz Piotr, 2016. "Is there a link between politics and stock returns? A literature survey," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 15-23.
    2. David Le Bris, 2012. "Stock Returns, Governments and Market Foresight in France, 1871-2008," Working Papers CEB 12-007, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    3. Tomasz Wisniewski & Geoffrey Lightfoot & Simon Lilley, 2012. "Speculating on presidential success: exploring the link between the price–earnings ratio and approval ratings," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 36(1), pages 106-122, January.
    4. Civilize, Sireethorn & Wongchoti, Udomsak & Young, Martin, 2015. "Military regimes and stock market performance," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(C), pages 76-95.
    5. Wisniewski, Tomasz Piotr & Lambe, Brendan John, 2015. "Does economic policy uncertainty drive CDS spreads?," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 447-458.
    6. K. Arin & Alexander Molchanov & Otto Reich, 2013. "Politics, stock markets, and model uncertainty," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 45(1), pages 23-38, August.
    7. Gabriel Rodríguez & Alfredo Vargas, 2012. "Impacto de expectativas políticas en los retornos del Índice General de la Bolsa de Valores de Lima," Revista Economía, Fondo Editorial - Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú, vol. 35(70), pages 190-223.

  3. Bohl, Martin T. & Gottschalk, Katrin & Pál, Rozália, 2006. "Institutional investors and stock market efficiency: The case of the January anomaly," MPRA Paper 677, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Nov 2006.

    Cited by:

    1. Juan Wang, 2011. "Transient institutional investors and insider trading signals," International Journal of Accounting and Information Management, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 19(2), pages 118-145, June.
    2. Oleg Badunenko & Michael Fritsch & Andreas Stephan, 2006. "Allocative Efficiency Measurement Revisited: Do We Really Need Input Prices?," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 591, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    3. Guglielmo Maria Caporale & Nicola Spagnolo, 2011. "Stock Market Integration between Three CEECs, Russia, and the UK," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(1), pages 158-169, February.
    4. Danny Yeung, 2012. "The Impact of Institutional Ownership: A Study of the Australian Equity Market," PhD Thesis, Finance Discipline Group, UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney, number 11, June.
    5. Jedrzej Bialkowski & Katrin Gottschalk & Tomasz Piotr Wisniewski, 2007. "Political orientation of government and stock market returns," Applied Financial Economics Letters, Taylor and Francis Journals, vol. 3(4), pages 269-273.
    6. Jonathan Wiley & Leonard Zumpano, 2009. "Institutional Investment and the Turn-of-the-Month Effect: Evidence from REITs," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 39(2), pages 180-201, August.

Articles

  1. Bialkowski, Jedrzej & Gottschalk, Katrin & Wisniewski, Tomasz Piotr, 2008. "Stock market volatility around national elections," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 32(9), pages 1941-1953, September.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Jedrzej Bialkowski & Katrin Gottschalk & Tomasz Piotr Wisniewski, 2007. "Political orientation of government and stock market returns," Applied Financial Economics Letters, Taylor and Francis Journals, vol. 3(4), pages 269-273.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Bohl, Martin T. & Gottschalk, Katrin, 2006. "International evidence on the Democrat premium and the presidential cycle effect," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 107-120, August.

    Cited by:

    1. Wisniewski, Tomasz Piotr, 2016. "Is there a link between politics and stock returns? A literature survey," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 15-23.
    2. Chrétien, Stéphane & Coggins, Frank, 2009. "Election outcomes and financial market returns in Canada," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 20(1), pages 1-23, March.
    3. Roman Kozhan, 2006. "Multiple Priors and No-Transaction Region," Working Papers wpn06-16, Warwick Business School, Finance Group.
    4. Oleg Badunenko & Michael Fritsch & Andreas Stephan, 2006. "Allocative Efficiency Measurement Revisited: Do We Really Need Input Prices?," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 591, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    5. Civilize, Sireethorn & Wongchoti, Udomsak & Young, Martin, 2015. "Military regimes and stock market performance," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(C), pages 76-95.
    6. Wisniewski, Tomasz Piotr & Lambe, Brendan John, 2015. "Does economic policy uncertainty drive CDS spreads?," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 447-458.
    7. Wisniewski, Tomasz P. & Pathan, Saima K., 2014. "Political environment and foreign direct investment: Evidence from OECD countries," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 13-23.
    8. Jedrzej Bialkowski & Katrin Gottschalk & Tomasz Piotr Wisniewski, 2007. "Political orientation of government and stock market returns," Applied Financial Economics Letters, Taylor and Francis Journals, vol. 3(4), pages 269-273.
    9. Anderson, Hamish D. & Malone, Christopher B. & Marshall, Ben R., 2008. "Investment returns under right- and left-wing governments in Australasia," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 16(3), pages 252-267, June.
    10. Vigenina, Denitsa & Kritikos, Alexander S., 2005. "The individual micro-lending contract: Is it a better design than joint-liability? - Evidence from Georgia," Working Paper Series 2005,10, European University Viadrina Frankfurt (Oder), The Postgraduate Research Programme Capital Markets and Finance in the Enlarged Europe.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 3 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-RMG: Risk Management (3) 2006-11-12 2006-11-12 2006-12-04
  2. NEP-CDM: Collective Decision-Making (2) 2006-11-12 2006-11-12
  3. NEP-CFN: Corporate Finance (2) 2006-11-12 2006-11-12
  4. NEP-PBE: Public Economics (2) 2006-11-12 2006-11-12
  5. NEP-POL: Positive Political Economics (2) 2006-11-12 2006-11-12

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