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Steve Charnovitz

Personal Details

First Name:Steve
Middle Name:
Last Name:Charnovitz
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pch1297
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]

Affiliation

Institute for International Economic Policy (IIEP)
Elliott School of International Affairs
George Washington University

Washington, District of Columbia (United States)
http://www.gwu.edu/~iiep/

:


RePEc:edi:iigwuus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Charnovitz, Steve & Hoekman, Bernard, 2012. "US Special Safeguard on Imports of Tires from China: Imposing Pain for Little Gain," CEPR Discussion Papers 9217, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Steve Charnovitz, "undated". "A Post-Montesquieu Analysis of the WTO," Working Papers 2010-3, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.

Articles

  1. Charnovitz, Steve & Hoekman, Bernard, 2013. "US–Tyres: Upholding a WTO Accession Contract – Imposing Pain for Little Gain," World Trade Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 12(02), pages 273-296, April.
  2. Steve Charnovitz, 2011. "What is International Economic Law?," Journal of International Economic Law, Oxford University Press, vol. 14(1), pages 3-22, March.
  3. Steve Charnovitz, 2010. "Addressing Government Failure Through International Financial Law," Journal of International Economic Law, Oxford University Press, vol. 13(3), pages 743-761, September.
  4. Steve Charnovitz, 2007. "The WTO's Environmental Progress," Journal of International Economic Law, Oxford University Press, vol. 10(3), pages 685-706, September.
  5. Steve Charnovitz, 2005. "A Close Look at a Few Points," Journal of International Economic Law, Oxford University Press, vol. 8(2), pages 311-319, June.
  6. Steve Charnovitz, 2005. "An Analysis of Pascal Lamy’s Proposal on Collective Preferences," Journal of International Economic Law, Oxford University Press, vol. 8(2), pages 449-472, June.
  7. Steve Charnovitz, 2004. "The Wto And Cosmopolitics," Journal of International Economic Law, Oxford University Press, vol. 7(3), pages 675-682, September.
  8. Steve Charnovitz, 2002. "The Legal Status of the Doha Declarations," Journal of International Economic Law, Oxford University Press, vol. 5(1), pages 207-211, March.
  9. Steve Charnovitz, 2001. "The WTO and the rights of the individual," Intereconomics: Review of European Economic Policy, Springer;German National Library of Economics;Centre for European Policy Studies (CEPS), vol. 36(2), pages 98-108, March.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

    Sorry, no citations of working papers recorded.

Articles

  1. Charnovitz, Steve & Hoekman, Bernard, 2013. "US–Tyres: Upholding a WTO Accession Contract – Imposing Pain for Little Gain," World Trade Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 12(02), pages 273-296, April.

    Cited by:

    1. Bown, Chad P. & Crowley, Meredith A, 2016. "The Empirical Landscape of Trade Policy," CEPR Discussion Papers 11216, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Sébastien Jean & Ariell Reshef, 2017. "Why Trade, and What Would Be the Consequences of Protectionism?," CEPII Policy Brief 2017-18, CEPII research center.

  2. Steve Charnovitz, 2011. "What is International Economic Law?," Journal of International Economic Law, Oxford University Press, vol. 14(1), pages 3-22, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Tăbușcă Silvia, 2010. "International Economic Law: Is There Any Tension Between The Trade Regime And Human Rights?," Romanian Economic Business Review, Romanian-American University, vol. 5(4-1), pages 129-135, Winter-Sp.

  3. Steve Charnovitz, 2007. "The WTO's Environmental Progress," Journal of International Economic Law, Oxford University Press, vol. 10(3), pages 685-706, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Thomas Eichner & Rüdiger Pethig, 2013. "Trade Tariffs and Self-Enforcing Environmental Agreements," CESifo Working Paper Series 4464, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. Henrik Horn & Petros C. Mavroidis, 2014. "Multilateral environmental agreements in the WTO: Silence speaks volumes," International Journal of Economic Theory, The International Society for Economic Theory, vol. 10(1), pages 147-166, March.
    3. Jale Tosun & Christoph Knill, 2011. "The Differential Impact of Economic Integration on Environmental Policy," Chapters,in: International Handbook on the Economics of Integration, Volume III, chapter 12 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. Eichner, Thomas & Pethig, Rüdiger, 2015. "Forging a global environmental agreement through trade sanctions on free riders?," Annual Conference 2015 (Muenster): Economic Development - Theory and Policy 112911, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    5. Doerr, Eva Maria, 2012. "Wandel oder Kontinuität: Ein kritischer Beitrag zur Diskussion um handelsrestriktive Umweltmaßnahmen im Rahmen der WTO," PIPE - Papers on International Political Economy 12/2012, Free University Berlin, Center for International Political Economy.
    6. Daniel Becker & Magdalena Brzeskot & Wolfgang Peters & Ulrike Will, 2013. "Grenzausgleichsinstrumente bei unilateralen Klimaschutzmaßnahmen. Eine ökonomische und WTO-rechtliche Analyse," Discussion Paper Series RECAP15 010, RECAP15, European University Viadrina, Frankfurt (Oder).
    7. Derek Kellenberg & Arik Levinson, 2013. "Waste of Effort? International Environmental Agreements," NBER Working Papers 19533, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Horn, Henrik & Mavroidis, Petros C., 2008. "The Permissible Reach of National Environmental Policies," Working Paper Series 739, Research Institute of Industrial Economics, revised 20 Jun 2008.

  4. Steve Charnovitz, 2004. "The Wto And Cosmopolitics," Journal of International Economic Law, Oxford University Press, vol. 7(3), pages 675-682, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Peter Carroll & Aynsley Kellow, 2011. "The OECD," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 4266, December.
    2. Hannah Murphy & Aynsley Kellow, 2013. "Forum Shopping in Global Governance: Understanding States, Business and NGOs in Multiple Arenas," Global Policy, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 4(2), pages 139-149, May.
    3. de Sépibus, Joëlle, 2012. "The UNFCCC at a Crossroads: Can Increased Involvement of Business and Industry Help Rescue the Multilateral Climate Regime?," Papers 429, World Trade Institute.

  5. Steve Charnovitz, 2002. "The Legal Status of the Doha Declarations," Journal of International Economic Law, Oxford University Press, vol. 5(1), pages 207-211, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Matthew Littleton, 2008. "The TRIPS Agreement and Transfer of Climate-Change-Related Technologies to Developing Countries," Working Papers 71, United Nations, Department of Economics and Social Affairs.

  6. Steve Charnovitz, 2001. "The WTO and the rights of the individual," Intereconomics: Review of European Economic Policy, Springer;German National Library of Economics;Centre for European Policy Studies (CEPS), vol. 36(2), pages 98-108, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Zimmermann, Thomas A., 2010. "The dangerous rise of economic interventionism," MPRA Paper 37262, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Susan Ariel Aaronson & M. Rodwan Abouharb, 2011. "Does the WTO Help Member States Clean Up?," Working Papers 2011-13, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.
    3. Susan Ariel Aaronson & M. Rodwan Abouharb, 2010. "Unexpected Bedfellows: The GATT, the WTO, and Some Democratic Rights," Working Papers 2010-12, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 1 paper announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. No paper was announced in a field specific NEP report

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