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Yogesh Uppal

Personal Details

First Name:Yogesh
Middle Name:
Last Name:Uppal
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pup7
http://www.as.ysu.edu/~yuppal/
One University Plaza, Youngstown, OH 44555
330-9413494

Affiliation

Economics Department
Youngstown State University

Youngstown, Ohio (United States)
http://www.as.ysu.edu/~econ/

:


RePEc:edi:edysuus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

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Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Nishith Prakash & Marc Rockmore & Yogesh Uppal, 2014. "Do Criminally Accused Politicians Affect Economic Outcomes? Evidence from India," HiCN Working Papers 192, Households in Conflict Network.
  2. Prakash, Nishith & Rockmore, Marc & Uppal, Yogesh, 2014. "Do Criminal Representatives Hinder or Improve Constituency Outcomes? Evidence from India," IZA Discussion Papers 8452, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Uppal, Yogesh & Glazer, Amihai, 2011. "Legislative turnover, fiscal policy, and economic growth: evidence from U.S. state legislatures," MPRA Paper 34186, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  4. Uppal, Yogesh, 2009. "Does legislative turnover adversely affect state expenditure policy? Evidence from Indian state elections," MPRA Paper 15657, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. Uppal, Yogesh, 2008. "Preferential trading areas: investment and welfare effects when countries differ in their size," MPRA Paper 15193, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  6. Uppal, Yogesh, 2008. "Estimation of the Incumbency Effects in the US State Legislatures: A Quasi-Experimental Approach," MPRA Paper 8575, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  7. Uppal, Yogesh, 2007. "The Disadvantaged Incumbents: Estimating Incumbency Effects in Indian State Legislatures," MPRA Paper 8515, University Library of Munich, Germany.

Articles

  1. Yogesh Uppal & Amihai Glazer, 2015. "Legislative Turnover, Fiscal Policy, And Economic Growth: Evidence From U.S. State Legislatures," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 53(1), pages 91-107, January.
  2. Baskaran, Thushyanthan & Min, Brian & Uppal, Yogesh, 2015. "Election cycles and electricity provision: Evidence from a quasi-experiment with Indian special elections," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 126(C), pages 64-73.
  3. Yogesh Uppal, 2011. "Does legislative turnover adversely affect state expenditure policy? Evidence from Indian state elections," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 147(1), pages 189-207, April.
  4. Yogesh Uppal, 2010. "Estimating Incumbency Effects In U.S. State Legislatures: A Quasi-Experimental Study," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 22(2), pages 180-199, July.
  5. Yogesh Uppal, 2009. "The disadvantaged incumbents: estimating incumbency effects in Indian state legislatures," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 138(1), pages 9-27, January.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

RePEc Biblio mentions

As found on the RePEc Biblio, the curated bibliography of Economics:
  1. Nishith Prakash & Marc Rockmore & Yogesh Uppal, 2014. "Do Criminally Accused Politicians Affect Economic Outcomes? Evidence from India," HiCN Working Papers 192, Households in Conflict Network.

    Mentioned in:

    1. > Political Economy > Political Economy of Asia > Political Economy of India

Working papers

  1. Nishith Prakash & Marc Rockmore & Yogesh Uppal, 2014. "Do Criminally Accused Politicians Affect Economic Outcomes? Evidence from India," HiCN Working Papers 192, Households in Conflict Network.

    Cited by:

    1. Philippe Aghion & Ufuk Akcigit & Julia Cage & William Kerr, 2016. "Taxation, corruption, and growth," Post-Print halshs-01496936, HAL.
    2. Imbert, Clément & Papp, John, 2018. "Costs and Benefits of Seasonal Migration : Evidence from India," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 1161, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
    3. Afridi, Farzana, 2017. "Governance and Public Service Delivery in India," IZA Discussion Papers 10856, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Sam Asher & Paul Novosad, 2017. "Politics and Local Economic Growth: Evidence from India," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 9(1), pages 229-273, January.

  2. Prakash, Nishith & Rockmore, Marc & Uppal, Yogesh, 2014. "Do Criminal Representatives Hinder or Improve Constituency Outcomes? Evidence from India," IZA Discussion Papers 8452, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    Cited by:

    1. Dhillon, Amrita & Krishnan, Pramila & Patnam, Manasa & Perroni, Carlo, 2016. "Electoral Accountability And The Natural Resource Curse: Theory And Evidence From India," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 295, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
    2. Kai Gehring & T. Florian Kauffeldt & Krishna Chaitanya Vadlamannati, 2015. "Crime, Incentives and Political Effort: A Model and Empirical Application for India," Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers 170, Courant Research Centre PEG.
    3. Dhillon, Amrita & Krishnan, Pramila & Patnam, Manasa & Perroni, Carlo, 2016. "The Natural Resource Curse Revisited:Theory and Evidence from India," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 268, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).

  3. Uppal, Yogesh & Glazer, Amihai, 2011. "Legislative turnover, fiscal policy, and economic growth: evidence from U.S. state legislatures," MPRA Paper 34186, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Cited by:

    1. Asako Yasushi & Matsubayashi Tetsuya & Ueda Michiko, 2016. "Legislative Term Limits and Government Spending: Theory and Evidence from the United States," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 16(3), pages 1501-1538, September.

  4. Uppal, Yogesh, 2009. "Does legislative turnover adversely affect state expenditure policy? Evidence from Indian state elections," MPRA Paper 15657, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Cited by:

    1. Kaushik, Arun & Rupayan Pal, 2012. "Political strongholds and budget allocation for developmental expenditure: Evidence from Indian states, 1971-2005," Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai Working Papers 2012-015, Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai, India.
    2. Nunn, Nathan & Qian, Nancy & Wen, Jaya, 2018. "Distrust and Political Turnover," CEPR Discussion Papers 12555, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Jan Fałkowski & Grażyna Bukowska, 2016. "Monopolizacja władzy a wyniki gospodarcze na poziomie Polski lokalnej," Gospodarka Narodowa, Warsaw School of Economics, issue 2, pages 91-120.
    4. Sandhya Garg, 2015. "Spatial convergence in public expenditure across Indian states: Implication of federal transfers," Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai Working Papers 2015-028, Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai, India.
    5. Yogesh Uppal & Amihai Glazer, 2015. "Legislative Turnover, Fiscal Policy, And Economic Growth: Evidence From U.S. State Legislatures," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 53(1), pages 91-107, January.

  5. Uppal, Yogesh, 2007. "The Disadvantaged Incumbents: Estimating Incumbency Effects in Indian State Legislatures," MPRA Paper 8515, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Cited by:

    1. Santosh Anagol & Thomas Fujiwara, 2014. "The Runner-Up Effect," NBER Working Papers 20261, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Devesh Kapur, Milan Vaishnav, 2011. " Quid Pro Quo: Builders, Politicians, and Election Finance in India- Working Paper 276," Working Papers 276, Center for Global Development.
    3. Hazama, Yasushi, 2012. "Non-economic voting and incumbent strength in Turkey," IDE Discussion Papers 340, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization(JETRO).
    4. Leandro De Magalhães & Salomo Hirvonen, 2015. "Multi-Office Incumbency Advantage: Political Careers in Brazil," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 15/662, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    5. Grégoire ROTA-GRAZIOSI & Clémence VERGNE & Blanca MORENO DODSON, 2012. "Breaking the wave of democracy: The effect of foreign aid on the incumbent’s re-election probability," Working Papers 201231, CERDI.
    6. Aditi Singhal, 2016. "Strength of Partisan and Candidate Ties in India," Working papers 266, Centre for Development Economics, Delhi School of Economics.
    7. Tandon, Sharad, 2012. "Election Outcomes and Food Security: Evidence from Consumption of Scheduled Castes and Tribes in India," 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington 124414, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    8. Marco Alberto De Benedetto, 2014. "Incumbency Advantage at Municipal Elections in Italy: A Quasi-Experimental Approach," Birkbeck Working Papers in Economics and Finance 1408, Birkbeck, Department of Economics, Mathematics & Statistics.
    9. Redmond, Paul & Regan, John, 2015. "Incumbency advantage in a proportional electoral system: A regression discontinuity analysis of Irish elections," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 244-256.
    10. Nishith Prakash & Marc Rockmore & Yogesh Uppal, 2018. "Do Criminally Accused Politicians Affect Economic Outcomes? Evidence from India," Working papers 2018-08, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
    11. Alkon, Meir, 2018. "Do special economic zones induce developmental spillovers? Evidence from India’s states," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 396-409.
    12. Aidt, T. & Golden, M. A. & Tiwari, D., 2011. "Incumbents and Criminals in the Indian National Legislature," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1157, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    13. Srinivasan, Sunderasan, 2014. "Economic populism, partial deregulation of transport fuels and electoral outcomes in India," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 465-475.
    14. O'Connell, Stephen D., 2018. "Can Quotas Increase the Supply of Candidates for Higher-Level Positions? Evidence from Local Government in India," IZA Discussion Papers 11286, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    15. Paul Redmond & John Regan, 2013. "Incumbency Advantage in Irish Elections: A Regression Discontinuity Analysis," Economics, Finance and Accounting Department Working Paper Series n241-13.pdf, Department of Economics, Finance and Accounting, National University of Ireland - Maynooth.
    16. Forand, Jean Guillaume, 2014. "Two-party competition with persistent policies," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 152(C), pages 64-91.
    17. Uppal, Yogesh, 2009. "Does legislative turnover adversely affect state expenditure policy? Evidence from Indian state elections," MPRA Paper 15657, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    18. Prakash, Nishith & Rockmore, Marc & Uppal, Yogesh, 2014. "Do Criminal Representatives Hinder or Improve Constituency Outcomes? Evidence from India," IZA Discussion Papers 8452, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    19. Sharad Tandon, 2015. "Taxation and Political Mobilization: Evidence from Andhra Pradesh," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 63(3), pages 515-549.
    20. Sonia Bhalotra & Irma Clots-Figueras & Lakshmi Iyer, 2013. "Path-Breakers: How Does Women’s Political Participation Respond to Electoral Success?," Harvard Business School Working Papers 14-035, Harvard Business School, revised Jan 2016.
    21. Lopes da Fonseca, Mariana, 2015. "Identifying the source of incumbency advantage through an electoral reform," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 239, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    22. Anna Katharina Spälti & Mark J. Brandt & Marcel Zeelenberg, 2017. "Memory retrieval processes help explain the incumbency advantage," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 12(2), pages 173-182, March.
    23. Crost, Benjamin & Kambhampati, Uma S., 2010. "Political Market Characteristics and the Provision of Educational Infrastructure in North India," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 195-204, February.
    24. Santosh Anagol & Thomas Fujiwara, 2016. "The Runner-Up Effect," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 124(4), pages 927-991.
    25. Leopoldo Fergusson & Pablo Querubín & Nelson A. Ruiz & Juan F. Vargas, 2017. "The Real Winner's Curse," DOCUMENTOS CEDE 015279, UNIVERSIDAD DE LOS ANDES-CEDE.
    26. Poonam Gupta & Arvind Panagariya, 2011. "India: Election Outcomes and Economic Performance," Working Papers 9999, School of International and Public Affairs, Columbia University, revised Apr 2011.
    27. Leandro De Magalhães, 2014. "Incumbency Effects in a Comparative Perspective: Evidence from Brazilian Mayoral Elections," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 14/643, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    28. Leandro De Magalhães, 2012. "Incumbency Effects in Brazilian Mayoral Elections: A Regression Discontinuity Design," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 12/284, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    29. Golden, Miriam & Picci, Lucio, 2011. "Redistribution and Reelection under Proportional Representation: The Postwar Italian Chamber of Deputies," MPRA Paper 29956, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    30. De Benedetto, Marco Alberto & De Paola, Maria, 2013. "The Impact of Incumbency on Turnout: Evidence from Italian Municipalities," IZA Discussion Papers 7612, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    31. Sam Asher & Paul Novosad, 2017. "Politics and Local Economic Growth: Evidence from India," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 9(1), pages 229-273, January.

Articles

  1. Yogesh Uppal & Amihai Glazer, 2015. "Legislative Turnover, Fiscal Policy, And Economic Growth: Evidence From U.S. State Legislatures," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 53(1), pages 91-107, January.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Baskaran, Thushyanthan & Min, Brian & Uppal, Yogesh, 2015. "Election cycles and electricity provision: Evidence from a quasi-experiment with Indian special elections," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 126(C), pages 64-73.

    Cited by:

    1. Shenoy, Ajay, 2018. "Regional development through place-based policies: Evidence from a spatial discontinuity," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 130(C), pages 173-189.
    2. Antonio Estache & Maleke Fourati, 2017. "Infrastructure Provision, Politics and Religion: Insights from Tunisia's New Democracy," Working Papers ECARES ECARES 2017-24, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    3. Carl T. Kitchens & Taylor Jaworski, 2016. "Ownership and the Price of Residential Electricity: Evidence from the United States, 1935-1940," NBER Working Papers 22254, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Subham Kailthya & Uma Kambhampati, 2016. "Political Economy of Healthcare Provision: Evidence from India," Economics & Management Discussion Papers em-dp2016-05, Henley Business School, Reading University.
    5. Nishith Prakash & Marc Rockmore & Yogesh Uppal, 2018. "Do Criminally Accused Politicians Affect Economic Outcomes? Evidence from India," Working papers 2018-08, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
    6. Baskaran, Thushyanthan & Blesse, Sebastian & Brender, Adi & Reingewertz, Yaniv, 2015. "Revenue decentralization, central oversight and the political budget cycle: Evidence from Israel," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 249, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    7. Samuel Bazzi & Matthew Gudgeon, 2017. "The Political Boundaries of Ethnic Divisions," Boston University - Department of Economics - Working Papers Series WP2018-005, Boston University - Department of Economics.
    8. Boräng, Frida & Jagers, Sverker C. & Povitkina, Marina, 2016. "Political determinants of electricity provision in small island developing states," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 98(C), pages 725-734.
    9. Alix-Garcia, Jennifer & Walker, Sarah & Bartlett, Anne & Onder, Harun & Sanghi, Apurva, 2018. "Do refugee camps help or hurt hosts? The case of Kakuma, Kenya," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 130(C), pages 66-83.
    10. Palit, Debajit & Bandyopadhyay, Kaushik Ranjan, 2017. "Rural electricity access in India in retrospect: A critical rumination," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 109(C), pages 109-120.
    11. Chao-yo Cheng & Johannes Urpelainen, 2016. "Unawareness and indifference to economic reform among the public: evidence from India’s power sector reform," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 17(3), pages 211-239, August.
    12. Wahl, Fabian & Pfeifer, Gregor & Marczak, Martyna, 2016. "Illuminating the World Cup Effect: Night Lights Evidence from South Africa," Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145938, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    13. Prakash, Nishith & Rockmore, Marc & Uppal, Yogesh, 2014. "Do Criminal Representatives Hinder or Improve Constituency Outcomes? Evidence from India," IZA Discussion Papers 8452, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    14. Pailler, Sharon, 2018. "Re-election incentives and deforestation cycles in the Brazilian Amazon," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 88(C), pages 345-365.
    15. Comello, Stephen D. & Reichelstein, Stefan J. & Sahoo, Anshuman & Schmidt, Tobias S., 2017. "Enabling Mini-Grid Development in Rural India," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 94-107.
    16. Malhotra, Abhishek & Schmidt, Tobias S. & Haelg, Leonore & Waissbein, Oliver, 2017. "Scaling up finance for off-grid renewable energy: The role of aggregation and spatial diversification in derisking investments in mini-grids for rural electrification in India," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 108(C), pages 657-672.
    17. Verena Kroth & Valentino Larcinese & Joachim Wehner, 2016. "A Better Life for All? Democratization and Electrification in Post-Apartheid South Africa," STICERD - Economic Organisation and Public Policy Discussion Papers Series 60, Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines, LSE.

  3. Yogesh Uppal, 2011. "Does legislative turnover adversely affect state expenditure policy? Evidence from Indian state elections," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 147(1), pages 189-207, April. See citations under working paper version above.
  4. Yogesh Uppal, 2010. "Estimating Incumbency Effects In U.S. State Legislatures: A Quasi-Experimental Study," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 22(2), pages 180-199, July.

    Cited by:

    1. Jorge Gallego, 2015. "Natural Disasters and Clientelism: the Case of Floods and Landslides in Colombia," DOCUMENTOS DE TRABAJO 012537, UNIVERSIDAD DEL ROSARIO.
    2. John Gilbert & Reza Oladi, 2011. "Net Campaign Contributions, Agricultural Interests, and Votes on Liberalizing Trade with China," Working Papers 2011-02, Utah State University, Department of Economics.
    3. Redmond, Paul & Regan, John, 2015. "Incumbency advantage in a proportional electoral system: A regression discontinuity analysis of Irish elections," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 244-256.
    4. Paul Redmond & John Regan, 2013. "Incumbency Advantage in Irish Elections: A Regression Discontinuity Analysis," Economics, Finance and Accounting Department Working Paper Series n241-13.pdf, Department of Economics, Finance and Accounting, National University of Ireland - Maynooth.
    5. Christopher Duquette & Franklin Mixon & Richard Cebula, 2013. "The Impact of Legislative Tenure and Seniority on General Election Success: Econometric Evidence from U.S. House Races," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 41(2), pages 161-172, June.
    6. Uppal, Yogesh, 2009. "Does legislative turnover adversely affect state expenditure policy? Evidence from Indian state elections," MPRA Paper 15657, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Tuvana Pastine & Ivan Pastine & Matthew T. Cole, 2013. "Incumbency Advantage in an Electoral Contest," Economics, Finance and Accounting Department Working Paper Series n242-13.pdf, Department of Economics, Finance and Accounting, National University of Ireland - Maynooth.
    8. Paul Redmond, 2017. "Incumbent-challenger and open-seat elections in a spatial model of political competition," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 170(1), pages 79-97, January.

  5. Yogesh Uppal, 2009. "The disadvantaged incumbents: estimating incumbency effects in Indian state legislatures," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 138(1), pages 9-27, January.
    See citations under working paper version above.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 7 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-POL: Positive Political Economics (6) 2008-05-10 2008-05-10 2009-06-17 2011-10-22 2014-12-08 2015-01-09. Author is listed
  2. NEP-CDM: Collective Decision-Making (3) 2008-05-10 2008-05-10 2009-06-17
  3. NEP-CWA: Central & Western Asia (2) 2008-05-10 2009-06-17
  4. NEP-CIS: Confederation of Independent States (1) 2011-10-22
  5. NEP-FDG: Financial Development & Growth (1) 2011-10-22
  6. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (1) 2009-06-17
  7. NEP-PBE: Public Economics (1) 2011-10-22

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