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Milan Nikolic

Personal Details

First Name:Milan
Middle Name:
Last Name:Nikolic
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RePEc Short-ID:pni64

Affiliation

University of Surrey, School of Arts (University of Surrey, School of Arts)

http://www.surrey.ac.uk/lcts/index.htm
UK, Guildford

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Milan Nikolic, 2002. "Russia and the IMF: Pseudo Lending for Pseudo Reforms," UCL SSEES Economics and Business working paper series 6, UCL School of Slavonic and East European Studies (SSEES).

Articles

  1. Nikolic, Milan, 2000. "Money Growth-Inflation Relationship in Postcommunist Russia," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 108-133, March.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

    Sorry, no citations of working papers recorded.

Articles

  1. Nikolic, Milan, 2000. "Money Growth-Inflation Relationship in Postcommunist Russia," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 108-133, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Ekaterina VOSTROKNUTOVA, 2003. "Polish Stabilization: What Can We Learn From the I (2) Cointegration Analysis," Economics Working Papers ECO2003/06, European University Institute.
    2. Jacek Wallusch, 2012. "How frequently do consumer prices change in transition countries?," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(10), pages 921-928, July.
    3. Paresh Kumar Narayan, 2010. "Modelling money demand for a panel of eight transitional economies," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(25), pages 3293-3305.
    4. Franziska L Ohnsorge & Nienke Oomes, 2005. "Money Demand and Inflation in Dollarized Economies; The Case of Russia," IMF Working Papers 05/144, International Monetary Fund.
    5. Frank Hespeler, 2013. "A VECM evaluation of monetary transmission in Uzbekistan," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 46(2), pages 219-253, May.
    6. Kulaksizoglu, Tamer & Kulaksizoglu, Sebnem, 2009. "The U.S. Excess Money Growth and Inflation Relation in the Long-Run: A Nonlinear Analysis," MPRA Paper 23780, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Granville, Brigitte & Mallick, Sushanta, 2006. "Does inflation or currency depreciation drive monetary policy in Russia?," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 163-179, June.
    8. Lena Malesevic-Perovic, 2009. "Cointegration Approach to Analysing Inflation in Croatia," Financial Theory and Practice, Institute of Public Finance, vol. 33(2), pages 201-218.
    9. Venla Sipilä, 2002. "The Russian triple crisis 1998: currency, finance and budget," UCL SSEES Economics and Business working paper series 17, UCL School of Slavonic and East European Studies (SSEES).

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