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David St John Jesson

Personal Details

First Name:David
Middle Name:St John
Last Name:Jesson
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pje5
Centre for Performance Evaluation & Resource Management Department of Economics University of York York YO10 5DD

Affiliation

(in no particular order)

Centre For Performance Evaluation And Resource Management (CPERM)
Department of Economics and Related Studies
University of York

York, United Kingdom
http://www.york.ac.uk/economics/research/centres/cperm/


+44-(0)1904-488674

RePEc:edi:cpermuk (more details at EDIRC)

Department of Economics and Related Studies
University of York

York, United Kingdom
http://www.york.ac.uk/economics/

(0)1904 323776

York YO10 5DD
RePEc:edi:deyoruk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers

Working papers

  1. David Jesson, "undated". "The Comparative Evaluation of GCSE Value-Added Performance by Type of School and LEA," Discussion Papers 00/52, Department of Economics, University of York.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. David Jesson, "undated". "The Comparative Evaluation of GCSE Value-Added Performance by Type of School and LEA," Discussion Papers 00/52, Department of Economics, University of York.

    Cited by:

    1. Basu, Anirban & Jones, Andrew M. & Dias, Pedro Rosa, 2018. "Heterogeneity in the impact of type of schooling on adult health and lifestyle," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 1-14.
    2. W Robert J Alexander & Alfred A. Haug & Mohammad Jaforullah, 2007. "A two-stage double-bootstrap data envelopment analysis of efficiency differences of New Zealand secondary schools," Working Papers 0714, University of Otago, Department of Economics, revised Nov 2007.
    3. Galindo-Rueda, Fernando & Vignoles, Anna, 2004. "The Heterogeneous Effect of Selection in Secondary Schools: Understanding the Changing Role of Ability," IZA Discussion Papers 1245, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Alan Manning & Jörn-Steffen Pischke, 2006. "Comprehensive Versus Selective Schooling in England and Wales: What Do We Know?," CEE Discussion Papers 0066, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
    5. Simon Burgess & Matt Dickson & Lindsey Macmillan, 2014. "Selective Schooling Systems Increase Inequality," DoQSS Working Papers 14-09, Department of Quantitative Social Science - UCL Institute of Education, University College London.
    6. Anirban Basu & Andrew M. Jones & Pedro Rosa Dias, 2014. "The Roles of Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Skills in Moderating the Effects of Mixed-Ability Schools on Long-Term Health," NBER Working Papers 20811, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Andrew Jones & John Roemer & Pedro Rosa Dias, 2014. "Equalising opportunities in health through educational policy," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 43(3), pages 521-545, October.
    8. Adele Atkinson & Paul Gregg & Brendon McConnell, 2006. "The Result of 11 Plus Selection: An Investigation into Opportunities and Outcomes for Pupils in Selective LEAs," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 06/150, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    9. Andrew M. Jones & Nigel Rice & Pedro Rosa Dias, 2011. "Long-Term Effects of School Quality on Health and Lifestyle: Evidence from Comprehensive Schooling Reforms in England," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 5(3), pages 342-376.

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