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Aaron L. Jackson

Personal Details

First Name:Aaron
Middle Name:L.
Last Name:Jackson
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pja162
http://aaronljackson.net
Terminal Degree:2002 Department of Economics; University of Oregon (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Department of Economics
Bentley University

Waltham, Massachusetts (United States)
http://www.bentley.edu/economics/

: (781) 891-2423

175 Forest Street, Waltham MA 02452-4705
RePEc:edi:debenus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Articles

Articles

  1. Gulley, O. David & Jackson, Aaron L., 2016. "A case study on using instructor-recorded videos in an upper level economics course," International Review of Economics Education, Elsevier, vol. 23(C), pages 28-33.
  2. O David Gulley & Aaron L Jackson, 2015. "Teaching a Class Dedicated to the College Fed Challenge Competition," Eastern Economic Journal, Palgrave Macmillan;Eastern Economic Association, vol. 41(4), pages 484-503, September.
  3. Aaron Jackson & David Ortmeyer & Michael Quinn, 2013. "Are immigrants really attracted to the welfare state? Evidence from OECD countries," International Economics and Economic Policy, Springer, vol. 10(4), pages 491-519, December.
  4. Patrick McHugh & Aaron Jackson, 2012. "Prediction Market Accuracy: The Impact Of Size, Incentives, Context And Interpretation," Journal of Prediction Markets, University of Buckingham Press, vol. 6(2), pages 22-46.
  5. Jackson, Aaron L., 2010. "Policy futures markets with multiple goals," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 45-54, March.
  6. Aaron Jackson & William Miles, 2009. "Quantitative goals for monetary policy: a quantile regression approach," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(16), pages 2065-2071.
  7. Aaron Jackson & William Miles, 2008. "Fixed Exchange Rates and Disinflation in Emerging Markets: How Large Is the Effect?," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 144(3), pages 538-557, October.
  8. Aaron L. Jackson & Scott Sumner, 2006. "Velocity Futures Markets: Does the Fed Need a Structural Model?," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 44(4), pages 716-728, October.
  9. Jackson, Aaron L., 2005. "Disinflationary Boom Reversion," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 9(04), pages 489-515, September.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Articles

  1. Aaron Jackson & David Ortmeyer & Michael Quinn, 2013. "Are immigrants really attracted to the welfare state? Evidence from OECD countries," International Economics and Economic Policy, Springer, vol. 10(4), pages 491-519, December.

    Cited by:

    1. Fedotenkov, Igor, 2015. "International Trade and Migration: Why Do Migrants Choose Small Countries?," MPRA Paper 66035, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Rikard Forslid & Sten Nyberg, 2017. "Brexit - Balancing Trade and Mobility," CESifo Working Paper Series 6718, CESifo Group Munich.
    3. Jana Tepperová & Stanislav Klazar, 2012. "Vliv sociálních systémů a jejich koordinace na ekonomickou migraci
      [The Impact of Social Systems and their Coordination on Economic Migration]
      ," Politická ekonomie, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2012(4), pages 505-522.

  2. Aaron Jackson & William Miles, 2009. "Quantitative goals for monetary policy: a quantile regression approach," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(16), pages 2065-2071.

    Cited by:

    1. Lin, Hsin-Yi, 2016. "Do quantitative monetary targets matter?," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 415-428.

  3. Aaron L. Jackson & Scott Sumner, 2006. "Velocity Futures Markets: Does the Fed Need a Structural Model?," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 44(4), pages 716-728, October.

    Cited by:

    1. Jackson, Aaron L., 2010. "Policy futures markets with multiple goals," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 45-54, March.
    2. Selgin, George & Lastrapes, William D. & White, Lawrence H., 2012. "Has the Fed been a failure?," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 569-596.
    3. Sumner Scott, 2006. "Let a Thousand Models Bloom: The Advantages of Making the FOMC a Truly 'Open Market'," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 6(1), pages 1-27, October.

  4. Jackson, Aaron L., 2005. "Disinflationary Boom Reversion," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 9(04), pages 489-515, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Mankiw, N. Gregory & Reis, Ricardo, 2002. "Sticky Information Versus Sticky Prices: A Proposal to Replace the New Keynesian Phillips Curve," Scholarly Articles 3415324, Harvard University Department of Economics.

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