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Mario Fiorini

Personal Details

First Name:Mario
Middle Name:
Last Name:Fiorini
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pfi119
http://datasearch.uts.edu.au/business/finance/staff/StaffDetails.cfm?UnitStaffId=3840
Terminal Degree:2007 Department of Economics; University College London (UCL) (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Economics Discipline Group
Business School
University of Technology Sydney

Sydney, Australia
http://business.uts.edu.au/economics/

: +61 2 9514 7777
+61 2 9514 7722
PO Box 123, Broadway NSW 2007, Sydney
RePEc:edi:edutsau (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Fiorini, Mario & Katrien Stevens, 2014. "Assessing the Monotonicity Assumption in IV and fuzzy RD designs," Working Papers 2014-13, University of Sydney, School of Economics.
  2. Edwards, Ben & Fiorini, Mario & Stevens, Katrien & Taylor, Matthew, 2013. "Is Monotonicity in an IV and RD design testable? No, but you can still check it," Working Papers 2013-06, University of Sydney, School of Economics.
  3. Mario Fiorini & Michael P. Keane, 2013. "How the Allocation of Children’s Time Affects Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Development," Working Paper Series 4, Economics Discipline Group, UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney.
  4. Ben Edwards & Mario Fiorini & Katrien Stevens & Matthew Taylor, 2013. "Is Monotonicity in an IV and RD Design Testable? No, But You Can Still Check on it," Working Paper Series 7, Economics Discipline Group, UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney.
  5. Mario Fiorini, 2008. "Fostering Educational Enrolment Through Subsidies: The Issue of Timing," Working Paper Series 157, Finance Discipline Group, UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney.
  6. Valentino Dardanoni & Mario Fiorini & Antonio Forcina, 2008. "Stochastic Monotonicity in Intergenerational Mobility Tables," Working Paper Series 156, Finance Discipline Group, UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney.

Articles

  1. Mario Fiorini & Michael P. Keane, 2014. "How the Allocation of Children's Time Affects Cognitive and Noncognitive Development," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 32(4), pages 787-836.
  2. Mario Fiorini, 2012. "Fostering Educational Enrolment Through Subsidies: The Issue Of Timing," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(5), pages 741-772, August.
  3. Valentino Dardanoni & Mario Fiorini & Antonio Forcina, 2012. "Stochastic monotonicity in intergenerational mobility tables," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(1), pages 85-107, January.
  4. Fiorini, M., 2010. "The effect of home computer use on children's cognitive and non-cognitive skills," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 55-72, February.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Fiorini, Mario & Katrien Stevens, 2014. "Assessing the Monotonicity Assumption in IV and fuzzy RD designs," Working Papers 2014-13, University of Sydney, School of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Lionel Page & Dipanwita Sarkar & Juliana S. Goncalves, 2015. "The older the bolder? Does relative age among peers influence children's confidence and risk attitudes?," QuBE Working Papers 029, QUT Business School.
    2. Page, Lionel & Sarkar, Dipanwita & Silva-Goncalves, Juliana, 2017. "The older the bolder: Does relative age among peers influence children’s preference for competition?," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 43-81.

  2. Mario Fiorini & Michael P. Keane, 2013. "How the Allocation of Children’s Time Affects Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Development," Working Paper Series 4, Economics Discipline Group, UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney.

    Cited by:

    1. Huong Thu Le & Ha Trong Nguyen, 2015. "Parental health and children’s cognitive and non-cognitive development: New evidence from the Longitudinal Survey of Australian Children," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1506, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
    2. Dionissi Aliprantis, 2014. "When Should Children Start School?," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 8(4), pages 481-536.
    3. Francesconi, Marco & Heckman, James J., 2016. "Symposium on Child Development and Parental Investment: Introduction," IZA Discussion Papers 9977, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Peter Frauke H. & Spiess C. Katharina, 2016. "Family Instability and Locus of Control in Adolescence," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 16(3), pages 1439-1471, September.
    5. Favara, Marta & Porter, Catherine & Woldehanna, Tassew, 2017. "Smarter through Social Protection? Evaluating the Impact of Ethiopia's Safety-Net on Child Cognitive Abilities," IZA Discussion Papers 10972, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. DellaVigna, Stefano & La Ferrara, Eliana, 2015. "Economic and Social Impacts of the Media," CEPR Discussion Papers 10667, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    7. Warn N. Lekfuangfu & Nattavudh Powdthavee & Nele Warrinnier & Francesca Cornaglia, 2016. "Locus of Control and Its Intergenerational Implications for Early Childhood Skill Formation," Working Papers 794, Queen Mary University of London, School of Economics and Finance.
    8. Sandner, Malte & Jungmann, Tanja, 2017. "Gender-specific effects of early childhood intervention: Evidence from a randomized controlled trial," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 59-78.
    9. Silke Anger & Daniel D. Schnitzlein, 2016. "Cognitive Skills, Non-Cognitive Skills, and Family Background: Evidence from Sibling Correlations," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 834, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    10. Conti, Gabriella & Frühwirth-Schnatter, Sylvia & Heckman, James J. & Piatek, Rémi, 2014. "Bayesian Exploratory Factor Analysis," IZA Discussion Papers 8338, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    11. Orla Doyle, 2017. "The First 2,000 Days and Child Skills: Evidence from a Randomized Experiment of Home Visiting," Working Papers 2017-054, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    12. Bruins, Marianne, 2017. "Women's economic opportunities and the intra-household production of child human capital," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 122-132.
    13. del Bono, Emilia & Francesconi, Marco, 2014. "Early Maternal Time Investment and Early Child Outcomes," CEPR Discussion Papers 10231, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    14. Dionissi Aliprantis, 2012. "When should children start school?," Working Paper 1126, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
    15. D. Del Boca & C. Monfardini & C. Nicoletti, 2012. "Self investments of adolescents and their cognitive development," Working Papers wp848, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
    16. Cheti Nicoletti & Valentina Tonei, 2017. "The response of parental time investments to the child’s skills and health," Discussion Papers 17/08, Department of Economics, University of York.
    17. Mark E. McGovern & Slawa Rokicki, 2017. "Heterogeneity in Early Life Investments: A Longitudinal Analysis of Children's Time Use," CHaRMS Working Papers 17-02, Centre for HeAlth Research at the Management School (CHaRMS).
    18. Peter Funk & Thorsten Kemper, 2016. "Leisure and Learning - Activities and Their Effects on Child Skill Development," Working Paper Series in Economics 85, University of Cologne, Department of Economics.
    19. Peter, Frauke H. & Spieß, C. Katharina, 2016. "Family Instability and Locus of Control in Adolescence," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - German National Library of Economics, pages 1439-1471.
    20. Marie C. Hull, 2017. "The time-varying role of the family in student time use and achievement," IZA Journal of Labor Economics, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 6(1), pages 1-20, December.
    21. Nguyen, Ha, 2015. "The evolution of the gender test score gap through seventh grade: New insights from Australia using quantile regression and decomposition," MPRA Paper 67586, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    22. Cobb-Clark, Deborah A & Salamanca, Nicholas & Zhu, Anna, 2016. "Parenting Style as an Investment in Human Development," Working Papers 2016-01, University of Sydney, School of Economics.
    23. Gaitz, Jason & Schurer, Stefanie, 2017. "Bonus Skills: Examining the Effect of an Unconditional Cash Transfer on Child Human Capital Formation," IZA Discussion Papers 10525, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    24. Elena Claudia Meroni & Daniela Piazzalunga & Chiara Pronzato, 2017. "Use of Extra-School Time and Child Non-Cognitive Development. Evidence from the UK," Department of Economics and Statistics Cognetti de Martiis. Working Papers 201732, University of Turin.
    25. Agne Suziedelyte, 2012. "Can video games affect children's cognitive and non-cognitive skills?," Discussion Papers 2012-37, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.
    26. Singh, Abhijeet, 2015. "Private school effects in urban and rural India: Panel estimates at primary and secondary school ages," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 113(C), pages 16-32.
    27. Abhijeet Singh, 2014. "Emergence and evolution of learning gaps across countries: Linked panel evidence from Ethiopia, India, Peru and Vietnam," CSAE Working Paper Series 2014-28, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    28. Nicoletti, Cheti & Tonei, Valentina, 2017. "The Response of Parental Time Investments to the Child's Skills and Health," IZA Discussion Papers 10993, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    29. Le, Huong & Nguyen, Ha, 2015. "Parental health and children’s cognitive and non-cognitive development: New evidence from the Longitudinal Survey of Australian Children," MPRA Paper 67590, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    30. Holford, Angus J., 2016. "Youth Employment and Academic Performance: Production Functions and Policy Effects," IZA Discussion Papers 10009, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    31. Francisco Azpitarte & Abraham Chigavazira & Guyonne Kalb & Brad M. Farrant & Francisco Perales & Stephen R. Zubrick, 2016. "Childcare Use and Its Role in Indigenous Child Development: Evidence from the Longitudinal Study of Indigenous Children in Australia," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2016n36, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    32. Susan E. Mayer & Ariel Kalil & Philip Oreopoulos & Sebastian Gallegos, 2015. "Using Behavioral Insights to Increase Parental Engagement: The Parents and Children Together (PACT) Intervention," NBER Working Papers 21602, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    33. Liyousew Gebremedhin Borga, 2015. "Children's Own Time Use and its Effect on Skill Formation," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp534, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
    34. Sevilla, Almudena & Borra, Cristina, 2015. "Parental Time Investments in Children: The Role of Competition for University Places in the UK," IZA Discussion Papers 9168, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    35. Patrick Bauer & Lyudmyla Sonchak, 2017. "The effect of macroeconomic conditions on parental time with children: evidence from the American time use survey," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 15(3), pages 905-924, September.
    36. Mathias Huebener & Daniel Kuehnle & C. Katharina Spiess, 2017. "Paid Parental Leave and Child Development: Evidence from the 2007 German Parental Benefit Reform and Administrative Data," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1651, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.

  3. Mario Fiorini, 2008. "Fostering Educational Enrolment Through Subsidies: The Issue of Timing," Working Paper Series 157, Finance Discipline Group, UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney.

    Cited by:

    1. Peter Arcidiacono & Paul B. Ellickson, 2011. "Practical Methods for Estimation of Dynamic Discrete Choice Models," Annual Review of Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 3(1), pages 363-394, September.

  4. Valentino Dardanoni & Mario Fiorini & Antonio Forcina, 2008. "Stochastic Monotonicity in Intergenerational Mobility Tables," Working Paper Series 156, Finance Discipline Group, UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney.

    Cited by:

    1. Pirmin Fessler & Peter Mooslechner & Martin Schürz, 2012. "Intergenerational transmission of educational attainment in Austria," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 39(1), pages 65-86, February.
    2. Yoram Amiel & Michele Bernasconi & Michele Bernasconi & Frank A Cowell & Valentino Dardanoni & Valentino Dardanoni, 2013. "Do We Value Mobility?," STICERD - Public Economics Programme Discussion Papers 17, Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines, LSE.
    3. Evans, R.J. & Forcina, A., 2013. "Two algorithms for fitting constrained marginal models," Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 1-7.
    4. Kanbur, Ravi & Stiglitz, Joseph E., 2015. "Dynastic Inequality, Mobility And Equality Of Opportunity," Working Papers 250014, Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management.
    5. R. Colombi & A. Forcina, 2016. "Testing order restrictions in contingency tables," Metrika: International Journal for Theoretical and Applied Statistics, Springer, vol. 79(1), pages 73-90, January.
    6. Francesco Andreoli & Claudio Zoli, 2014. "Measuring Dissimilarity," Working Papers 23/2014, University of Verona, Department of Economics.
    7. R. Colombi & A. Forcina, 2016. "Testing order restrictions in contingency tables," Metrika: International Journal for Theoretical and Applied Statistics, Springer, vol. 79(1), pages 73-90, January.
    8. Delgado, Miguel A. & Escanciano, Juan Carlos, 2012. "Distribution-free tests of stochastic monotonicity," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 170(1), pages 68-75.
    9. Berrittella, Maria & Dardanoni, Valentino, 2016. "Nonlinearity in intergenerational income transmission: A cross-country analysis," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 1-10.

Articles

  1. Mario Fiorini & Michael P. Keane, 2014. "How the Allocation of Children's Time Affects Cognitive and Noncognitive Development," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 32(4), pages 787-836.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Mario Fiorini, 2012. "Fostering Educational Enrolment Through Subsidies: The Issue Of Timing," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(5), pages 741-772, August.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Valentino Dardanoni & Mario Fiorini & Antonio Forcina, 2012. "Stochastic monotonicity in intergenerational mobility tables," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(1), pages 85-107, January.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  4. Fiorini, M., 2010. "The effect of home computer use on children's cognitive and non-cognitive skills," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 55-72, February.

    Cited by:

    1. Mario Fiorini & Michael P. Keane, 2014. "How the Allocation of Children's Time Affects Cognitive and Noncognitive Development," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 32(4), pages 787-836.
    2. Robert W. Fairlie & Samantha H. Grunberg, 2014. "Access To Technology And The Transfer Function Of Community Colleges: Evidence From A Field Experiment," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 52(3), pages 1040-1059, July.
    3. Fairlie, Robert, 2015. "Do Boys and Girls Use Computers Differently, and Does It Contribute to Why Boys doWorse in School than Girls?," Santa Cruz Department of Economics, Working Paper Series qt4n54q8xh, Department of Economics, UC Santa Cruz.
    4. Benjamin Faber & Rosa Sanchis-Guarner & Felix Weinhardt, 2015. "ICT and Education: Evidence from Student Home Addresses," NBER Working Papers 21306, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Hull, Marie C. & Duch, Katherine, 2017. "One-To-One Technology and Student Outcomes," IZA Discussion Papers 10886, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Laura Pagani & Gianluca Argentin & Marco Gui & Luca Stanca, 2015. "The Impact of Digital Skills on Educational Outcomes: Evidence from Performance Tests," Working Papers 304, University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Economics, revised Jul 2015.
    7. Roland G. Fryer, Jr, 2016. "The Production of Human Capital in Developed Countries: Evidence from 196 Randomized Field Experiments," NBER Working Papers 22130, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Robert W. Fairlie & Ariel Kalil, 2016. "The Effects of Computers on Children’s Social Development and School Participation: Evidence from a Randomized Control Experiment," NBER Working Papers 22907, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Schwerdt, Guido & Chingos, Matthew M., 2015. "Virtual Schooling and Student Learning: Evidence from the Florida Virtual School," Annual Conference 2015 (Muenster): Economic Development - Theory and Policy 113202, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    10. Patricia Dinis Mota da Costa & Luisa De Sousa Lobo Borges de Araujo, 2016. "Digital Reading in PISA 2012 and ICT Uses: How do VET and General Education Students Perform?," JRC Working Papers JRC104713, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
    11. Mark E. McGovern & Slawa Rokicki, 2017. "Heterogeneity in Early Life Investments: A Longitudinal Analysis of Children's Time Use," CHaRMS Working Papers 17-02, Centre for HeAlth Research at the Management School (CHaRMS).
    12. Louis-Philippe Beland & Richard Murphy, 2015. "Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction & Student Performance," CEP Discussion Papers dp1350, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    13. Jacob L. Vigdor & Helen F. Ladd, 2010. "Scaling the Digital Divide: Home Computer Technology and Student Achievement," NBER Working Papers 16078, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    14. Bowden, Mark P. & Doughney, James, 2012. "The importance of cultural and economic influences behind the decision to attend higher education," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 95-103.
    15. Ihmeideh, Fathi & Alkhawaldeh, Mustafa, 2017. "Teachers' and parents' perceptions of the role of technology and digital media in developing child culture in the early years," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 139-146.
    16. Bulman, George & Fairlie, Robert W., 2015. "Technology and Education: Computers, Software, and the Internet," IZA Discussion Papers 9432, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    17. Fairlie, Robert W., 2012. "Academic achievement, technology and race: Experimental evidence," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(5), pages 663-679.
    18. Fairlie, Robert W. & Robinson, Jonathan, 2013. "Experimental Evidence on the Effects of Home Computers on Academic Achievement among Schoolchildren," Santa Cruz Department of Economics, Working Paper Series qt5759k24s, Department of Economics, UC Santa Cruz.
    19. Robert Fairlie & Jonathan Robinson, 2011. "The Effects of Home Computers on Educational Outcomes. Evidence from a Field Experiment with Schoolchildren," Working Papers 11-14, NET Institute, revised Sep 2011.
    20. Agne Suziedelyte, 2012. "Can video games affect children's cognitive and non-cognitive skills?," Discussion Papers 2012-37, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.
    21. Fairlie, Robert W., 2012. "The effects of home access to technology on computer skills: Evidence from a field experiment," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 24(3), pages 243-253.
    22. Rasheda Khanam & Son Nghiem, 2016. "Family Income and Child Cognitive and Noncognitive Development in Australia: Does Money Matter?," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 53(3), pages 597-621, June.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 5 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-ECM: Econometrics (2) 2013-04-13 2014-12-24
  2. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (2) 2008-12-07 2008-12-07
  3. NEP-CBE: Cognitive & Behavioural Economics (1) 2013-04-13
  4. NEP-EDU: Education (1) 2008-12-07
  5. NEP-NEU: Neuroeconomics (1) 2013-04-13

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