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Jan B. Engelmann

Personal Details

First Name:Jan
Middle Name:B.
Last Name:Engelmann
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pen85
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]

Affiliation

Institut für Volkswirtschaftslehre
Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakutät
Universität Zürich

Zürich, Switzerland
http://www.econ.uzh.ch/

: +41-1-634 21 37
+41-1-634 49 82
Schönberggasse 1, CH-8001 Zürich
RePEc:edi:seizhch (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Alain Cohn & Jan Engelmann & Ernst Fehr & Michel Maréchal, 2013. "Evidence for countercyclical risk aversion: an experiment with financial professionals," UBSCENTER - Working Papers 004, UBS International Center of Economics in Society - Department of Economics - University of Zurich, revised Aug 2014.
  2. C. Monica Capra & Bing Jiang & Jan Engelmann & Gregory Berns, 2012. "Can Personality Type Explain Heterogeneity in Probability Distortions?," Emory Economics 1205, Department of Economics, Emory University (Atlanta).
  3. Brooks, A. & Chandrasekhar Pammi, V.S. & Noussair, C.N. & Capra, C.M. & Engelmann, J. & Berns, G.S., 2010. "Bad to worse : Striatal coding of the relative value of painful decisions," Other publications TiSEM ff9ee590-9456-44db-8b3c-7, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
  4. Engelmann, Jan B. & Damaraju, Eswar & Padmala, Srikanth & Pessoa, Luiz, 2009. "Combined effects of attention and motivation on visual task performance: transient and sustained motivational effects," MPRA Paper 52133, University Library of Munich, Germany.

Articles

  1. Alain Cohn & Jan Engelmann & Ernst Fehr & Michel André Maréchal, 2015. "Evidence for Countercyclical Risk Aversion: An Experiment with Financial Professionals," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 105(2), pages 860-885, February.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Alain Cohn & Jan Engelmann & Ernst Fehr & Michel Maréchal, 2013. "Evidence for countercyclical risk aversion: an experiment with financial professionals," UBSCENTER - Working Papers 004, UBS International Center of Economics in Society - Department of Economics - University of Zurich, revised Aug 2014.

    Cited by:

    1. Baillon, Aurélien & Koellinger, Philipp D. & Treffers, Theresa, 2016. "Sadder but wiser: The effects of emotional states on ambiguity attitudes," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 67-82.
    2. Dohmen, Thomas & Lehmann, Hartmut & Pignatti, Norberto, 2015. "Time-Varying Individual Risk Attitudes over the Great Recession: A Comparison of Germany and Ukraine," IZA Discussion Papers 9333, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Ganglmair, Bernhard & Holcomb, Alex & Myung, Noah, 2016. "Cutthroats or comrades: Information sharing among competing fund managers," MPRA Paper 71506, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Hett, Florian & Kröll, Markus & Mechtel, Mario, 2017. "Choosing Who You Are: The Structure and Behavioral Effects of Revealed Identification Preferences," Annual Conference 2017 (Vienna): Alternative Structures for Money and Banking 168223, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    5. Lukas Menkhoff & Sahra Sakha, 2016. "Determinants of Risk Aversion over Time: Experimental Evidence from Rural Thailand," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1582, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    6. Meier, Armando N. & Schmid, Lukas D. & Stutzer, Alois, 2016. "Rain, Emotions and Voting for the Status Quo," IZA Discussion Papers 10350, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Anthony Newell & Lionel Page, 2017. "Countercyclical risk aversion and self-reinforcing feedback loops in experimental asset markets," QuBE Working Papers 050, QUT Business School.
    8. Bucciol, Alessandro & Zarri, Luca, 2015. "The shadow of the past: Financial risk taking and negative life events," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 1-16.
    9. Paola Morales Acevedo & Steven Ongena, 2016. "Fear, Anger and Credit. On Bank Robberies and Loan Conditions," BAFFI CAREFIN Working Papers 1513, BAFFI CAREFIN, Centre for Applied Research on International Markets Banking Finance and Regulation, Universita' Bocconi, Milano, Italy.
    10. Franziska Tausch & Maria Zumbuehl, 2016. "Stability of Risk Attitudes and Media Coverage of Economic News," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 824, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    11. David Dillenberger & Kareen Rozen, 2010. "History-Dependent Risk Attitude," Levine's Bibliography 661465000000000184, UCLA Department of Economics.
    12. Dominique Pépin, 2015. "Intertemporal Substitutability, Risk aversion and Asset Prices," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 35(4), pages 2233-2241.
    13. Elif Sisli Ciamarra & Tanseli Savaser, 2015. "Managerial Performance Incentives and Firm Risk during Economic Expansions and Recessions," Working Papers 93, Brandeis University, Department of Economics and International Businesss School.
    14. Peter Koudijs & Hans-Joachim Voth, 2016. "Leverage and Beliefs: Personal Experience and Risk-Taking in Margin Lending," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 106(11), pages 3367-3400, November.
    15. Ofir D. Rubin & Rico Ihle, 2017. "Measuring Temporal Dimensions of the Intensity of Violent Political Conflict," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 132(2), pages 621-642, June.
    16. Kairies-Schwarz, Nadja & Kokot, Johanna & Vomhof, Markus & Weßling, Jens, 2017. "Health insurance choice and risk preferences under cumulative prospect theory – an experiment," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 137(C), pages 374-397.
    17. Massimiliano Caporin & Luca Corazzini & Michele Costola, 2014. "Measuring the Behavioral Component of Financial Fluctuations: An Analysis Based on the S&P 500," CREATES Research Papers 2014-33, Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University.
    18. Lina Koppel & David Andersson & India Morrison & Kinga Posadzy & Daniel Västfjäll & Gustav Tinghög, 2017. "The effect of acute pain on risky and intertemporal choice," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 20(4), pages 878-893, December.
    19. Decker, Simon & Schmitz, Hendrik, 2015. "Health shocks and risk aversion," Ruhr Economic Papers 581, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    20. Lubomir Cingl & Jana Cahlikova, 2013. "Risk Preferences under Acute Stress," Working Papers IES 2013/17, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, revised Nov 2013.
    21. Gerhardt, Holger & Schildberg-Hörisch, Hannah & Willrodt, Jana, 2017. "Does self-control depletion affect risk attitudes?," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 100(C), pages 463-487.
    22. Theresa Treffers & Philipp D. Koellinger & Arnold Picot, 2016. "Do Affective States Influence Risk Preferences?," Schmalenbach Business Review, Springer;Schmalenbach-Gesellschaft, vol. 17(3), pages 309-335, December.
    23. Jan Goebel & Christian Krekel & Tim Tiefenbach & Nicolas R. Ziebarth, 2015. "How Natural Disasters Can Affect Environmental Concerns, Risk Aversion, and Even Politics: Evidence from Fukushima and Three European Countries," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 762, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    24. Silvio Aldrovandi & Petko Kusev & Tetiana Hill & Ivo Vlaev, 2017. "Context Moderates Priming Effects on Financial Risk Taking," Risks, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 5(1), pages 1-11, March.
    25. Chen, Daniel Li & Schonger, Martin & Wickens, Chris, 2015. "oTree - An Open-Source Platform for Laboratory, Online, and Field Experiments," MPRA Paper 62730, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    26. Alain Cohn & Michel André Maréchal, 2016. "Priming in economics," ECON - Working Papers 226, Department of Economics - University of Zurich.
    27. Krämer Walter, 2014. "Thünen-Vorlesung 2014: Zur Ökonomie von Panik, Angst und Risiko," Perspektiven der Wirtschaftspolitik, De Gruyter, vol. 15(4), pages 367-377, December.
    28. Hardardottir, Hjördis, 2016. "Long Term Stability of Time Preferences and the Role of the Macroeconomic Situation," Working Papers 2016:5, Lund University, Department of Economics, revised 29 Aug 2016.
    29. Ungeheuer, Michael & Weber, Martin, 2016. "The Perception of Dependence, Investment Decisions, and Stock Prices," CEPR Discussion Papers 11585, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    30. Alain Cohn & Ernst Fehr & Michel André Maréchal, 2017. "Do Professional Norms in the Banking Industry Favor Risk-taking?," CESifo Working Paper Series 6398, CESifo Group Munich.
    31. Ioan Roxana, 2015. "The Influence Of Stock Market Investors’ Behavior On Business Cycles," Annals - Economy Series, Constantin Brancusi University, Faculty of Economics, vol. 6, pages 136-144, December.
    32. Karl H.Schlag, 2015. "Who gives Direction to Statistical Testing? Best Practice meets Mathematically Correct Tests," Vienna Economics Papers 1512, University of Vienna, Department of Economics.
    33. Armin Falk & Florian Zimmermann, 2016. "Beliefs and Utility: Experimental Evidence on Preferences for Information," CESifo Working Paper Series 6061, CESifo Group Munich.
    34. He, Tai-Sen, 2017. "“I” make you risk-averse: The effect of first-person pronoun use in a lottery choice experiment," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 153(C), pages 39-42.
    35. Grosse Steffen, Christoph & Podstawski, Maximilian, 2017. "Ambiguity and Time-Varying Risk Aversion in Sovereign Debt Markets," Annual Conference 2017 (Vienna): Alternative Structures for Money and Banking 168101, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    36. Epper, Thomas & Fehr-Duda, Helga, 2017. "A Tale of Two Tails: On the Coexistence of Overweighting and Underweighting of Rare Extreme Events," Economics Working Paper Series 1705, University of St. Gallen, School of Economics and Political Science.
    37. Baghestanian, Sascha & Massenot, Baptiste, 2016. "Credit cycles: Experimental evidence," SAFE Working Paper Series 104 [rev.], Research Center SAFE - Sustainable Architecture for Finance in Europe, Goethe University Frankfurt.
    38. Bosman, Ronald & Kräussl, Roman & Mirgorodskaya, Elizaveta, 2017. "Modifier words in the financial press and investor expectations," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 138(C), pages 85-98.
    39. Ungeheuer, Michael & Weber, Martin, 2016. "The Perception of Dependence and Investment Decisions," CEPR Discussion Papers 11188, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    40. Franziska Tausch & Maria Zumbuehl, 2016. "Stability of risk attitudes and media coverage of economic news," Discussion Paper Series of the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods 2016_02, Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods.
    41. Tai-Sen HE & Fuhai HONG, 2014. "Exposure to Risk and Risk Aversion: A Laboratory Experiment," Economic Growth Centre Working Paper Series 1403, Nanyang Technological University, School of Social Sciences, Economic Growth Centre.

  2. C. Monica Capra & Bing Jiang & Jan Engelmann & Gregory Berns, 2012. "Can Personality Type Explain Heterogeneity in Probability Distortions?," Emory Economics 1205, Department of Economics, Emory University (Atlanta).

    Cited by:

    1. Lubomir Cingl & Jana Cahlikova, 2013. "Risk Preferences under Acute Stress," Working Papers IES 2013/17, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, revised Nov 2013.
    2. Alessandro Gandolfo & Valeria De Bonis, 2014. "Motivations for gambling and the choice between skill and luck gambling products: an exploratory study," Discussion Papers 2014/185, Dipartimento di Economia e Management (DEM), University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy.
    3. Valeria De Bonis & Alessandro Gandolfo, 2015. "Predictors of gambling among university students: the role of gender, sociality and attitudes towards risk," Public Finance Research Papers 11, Istituto di Economia e Finanza, DIGEF, Sapienza University of Rome.

  3. Brooks, A. & Chandrasekhar Pammi, V.S. & Noussair, C.N. & Capra, C.M. & Engelmann, J. & Berns, G.S., 2010. "Bad to worse : Striatal coding of the relative value of painful decisions," Other publications TiSEM ff9ee590-9456-44db-8b3c-7, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.

    Cited by:

    1. Alain Cohn & Jan Engelmann & Ernst Fehr & Michel André Maréchal, 2015. "Evidence for Countercyclical Risk Aversion: An Experiment with Financial Professionals," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 105(2), pages 860-885, February.
    2. Sumitava Mukherjee & Arvind Sahay & V. S. Chandrasekhar Pammi & Narayanan Srinivasan, 2017. "Is loss-aversion magnitude-dependent? Measuring prospective affective judgments regarding gains and losses," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 12(1), pages 81-89, January.
    3. Armin Falk & Florian Zimmermann, 2016. "Beliefs and Utility: Experimental Evidence on Preferences for Information," CESifo Working Paper Series 6061, CESifo Group Munich.

  4. Engelmann, Jan B. & Damaraju, Eswar & Padmala, Srikanth & Pessoa, Luiz, 2009. "Combined effects of attention and motivation on visual task performance: transient and sustained motivational effects," MPRA Paper 52133, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Cited by:

    1. Strombach, Tina & Hubert, Marco & Kenning, Peter, 2015. "The neural underpinnings of performance-based incentives," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 1-12.

Articles

  1. Alain Cohn & Jan Engelmann & Ernst Fehr & Michel André Maréchal, 2015. "Evidence for Countercyclical Risk Aversion: An Experiment with Financial Professionals," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 105(2), pages 860-885, February.
    See citations under working paper version above.Sorry, no citations of articles recorded.

More information

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Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 2 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-CBE: Cognitive & Behavioural Economics (2) 2012-05-08 2013-09-24. Author is listed
  2. NEP-EXP: Experimental Economics (2) 2012-05-08 2013-09-24. Author is listed
  3. NEP-UPT: Utility Models & Prospect Theory (1) 2013-09-24. Author is listed

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