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Publications

by members of

School of Business
Westminster College
Salt Lake City, Utah (United States)

These are publications listed in RePEc written by members of the above institution who are registered with the RePEc Author Service. Thus this compiles the works all those currently affiliated with this institution, not those affilated at the time of publication. List of registered members. Register yourself. Citation analysis. This page is updated in the first days of each month.
| Working papers | Journal articles |

Working papers

2009

  1. Axelsen, Dan & Snarr, Hal W. & Friesner, Dan, 2009. "Teaching consumer theory to business students: an integrative approach," MPRA Paper 37249, University Library of Munich, Germany.

2007

  1. Snarr, Hal W. & Axelsen, Dan, 2007. "Accounting for peak shifting in traditional cost-benefit analysis," MPRA Paper 37060, University Library of Munich, Germany.

2006

  1. Snarr, Hal W. & Burkey, Mark L., 2006. "A preliminary investigation of welfare migration induced by time limits," MPRA Paper 36228, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Axelsen, Dan & Snarr, Hal W., 2006. "Analyzing Washington state's welfare program design, workfirst," MPRA Paper 37248, University Library of Munich, Germany.

2005

  1. Snarr, Hal W. & Gold, Steven C., 2005. "The design and use of macroeconomics simulation using maple software: A pilot study," MPRA Paper 37061, University Library of Munich, Germany.

Journal articles

2018

  1. Lynn B. Snarr & Hal Snarr & Dan Friesner, 2018. "Is NY's Supply-Side Experiment Working? A Preliminary Analysis using County Unemployment Rates," Review of Economic Analysis, Digital Initiatives at the University of Waterloo Library, vol. 10(3), pages 245-266, May.
  2. John P. Watkins, 2018. "The Stories That Economists Tell: Mainstream, Hyman Minsky, and Institutional Views of Consumer Behavior," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 52(2), pages 534-540, April.

2017

  1. John P. Watkins & James E. Seidelman, 2017. "A Veblenian Analysis of For-Profit Universities," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 51(2), pages 366-374, April.

2016

  1. Richard E. Haskell, 2016. "Effects of Dual-Credit Enrollment and Early College High School on Utah Public Education," Applied Economics and Finance, Redfame publishing, vol. 3(2), pages 54-72, May.

2015

  1. Alfredo A. Romero & Hal W. Snarr, 2015. "Obstacles and Catalysts of Productive Mobility in the United States," Journal of Economic Insight (formerly the Journal of Economics (MVEA)), Missouri Valley Economic Association, vol. 41(1), pages 57-83.
  2. John P. Watkins, 2015. "Economic Waste and Social Provisioning: Veblen and Keynes on the Wealth Effect," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(2), pages 441-448, April.

2014

  1. John Watkins, 2014. "Quantitative Easing as a Means of Reducing Unemployment: A New Version of Trickle-Down Economics," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(2), pages 431-440.

2013

  1. Hal W. Snarr, 2013. "Was it the economy or reform that precipitated the steep decline in the US welfare caseload?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(4), pages 525-540, February.

2011

  1. Hal W. Snarr & Daniel Friesner & Mark L. Burkey, 2011. "Unintended Migration Consequences of US Welfare Reform," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 41(3), pages 233-252, December.
  2. John Watkins, 2011. "Banking Ethics and the Goldman Rule," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(2), pages 363-372.

2010

  1. John Watkins, 2010. "Mainstream Efforts to Tell a Better Story - Natural Selection as a Misplaced Metaphor: The Problem of Corporate Power," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(4), pages 991-1008.
  2. John Watkins, 2010. "Rescuing the Rentier — Neoliberalism, Social Imbalance, and the Current Economic Crisis: A Synthesis of Keynes, Galbraith, and Minsky," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(2), pages 471-478.

2009

  1. Hal Snarr & Jeffrey Edwards, 2009. "Does income support increase abortions?," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 33(4), pages 575-599, November.
  2. John Watkins, 2009. "Corporate Profits and Personal Misery: Credit, Gender, and the Distribution of Income," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(2), pages 413-422.

2008

  1. Hal Snarr & Dan Axelsen, 2008. "Are Welfare Eligible Households Forward Looking?," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 9(8), pages 1-9.

2007

  1. Dan Axelsen & Dan Friesner & Robert Rosenman & Hal Snarr, 2007. "Welfare recipient work choice and in-kind benefits in Washington state," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(8), pages 1021-1036.
  2. John P. Watkins, 2007. "Economic Institutions under Disaster Situations: The Case of Hurricane Katrina," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(2), pages 477-484, June.

2006

  1. Snarr, Hal W. & Burkey, Mark L., 2006. "A Preliminary Investigation of Welfare Migration Induced by Time Limits," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 36(2), pages 1-16.

2003

  1. John P. Watkins, 2003. "Beyond the Market: The Social Foundations of Economic Efficiency," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(4), pages 1201-1203, December.

2000

  1. John P. Watkins, 2000. "Thomas DeGregori’s “Back to the Future”: A Comment," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(1), pages 177-182, March.
  2. John P. Watkins, 2000. "Corporate Power and the Evolution of Consumer Credit," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(4), pages 909-932, December.

1998

  1. John P. Watkins, 1998. "Towards a Reconsideration of Social Evolution: Symbiosis and Its Implications for Economics," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(1), pages 87-106, March.

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