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Disability Care and Support

Author

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  • Commission, Productivity

    () (Productivity Commission)

Abstract

The Productivity Commission inquiry report — Disability Care and Support — was released on 10 August 2011. Current disability support arrangements are inequitable, underfunded, fragmented, and inefficient and give people with a disability little choice. They provide no certainty that people will be able to access appropriate supports when needed. While some governments have performed much better than others, and there are pockets of success, overall, no disability support arrangements in any jurisdiction are working well in all of the areas where change is required. The current arrangements cannot be called a genuine ‘system’ in which different elements work together to achieve desired outcomes. The central message of this report is that a coherent and certain system for people with a disability is required — with much more and better-directed resourcing, a national approach, and a shift in decision-making to people with a disability and their carers. This overview explains what is wrong with the current arrangements and how to improve them. It shows how a new system would work for people with a disability and their families, and how it would provide benefits for the community as a whole. This overview booklet contains the key points, and an extensive summary of the Commission's analysis and recommendations. For the detailed supporting material, please view the full report from the Commission’s website.

Suggested Citation

  • Commission, Productivity, 2011. "Disability Care and Support," Inquiry Reports, Productivity Commission, Government of Australia, volume 0, number 54.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:prodir:0054
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    File URL: http://www.pc.gov.au/projects/inquiry/disability-support/report
    File Function: Publication webpage
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Mendes, Philip & Snow, Pamela, 2014. "The needs and experiences of young people with a disability transitioning from out-of-home care: The views of practitioners in Victoria, Australia," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 115-123.
    2. Nguyen, Ha Trong & Connelly, Luke Brian, 2014. "The effect of unpaid caregiving intensity on labour force participation: Results from a multinomial endogenous treatment model," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 100(C), pages 115-122.
    3. Milner, A. & Krnjacki, L. & Butterworth, P. & Kavanagh, A. & LaMontagne, Anthony D., 2015. "Does disability status modify the association between psychosocial job quality and mental health? A longitudinal fixed-effects analysis," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 144(C), pages 104-111.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    disability; disability care; disability support; NDIS; National Disability Insurance Scheme; disability services; no-fault National Injury Insurance Scheme;

    JEL classification:

    • H51 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Health
    • I11 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Analysis of Health Care Markets
    • I14 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Inequality
    • J14 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of the Elderly; Economics of the Handicapped; Non-Labor Market Discrimination

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