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A Not-so-dismal Science: A Broader View of Economies and Societies


  • Olson, Mancur
    (Center for Institutional Reform and the Informal Sector (IRIS))

  • Kahkohnen, Satu


Modern economics is like a metropolitan area. Economists' ideas about business and markets are like the magnificent buildings of the city centre. Yet most growth and prosperity is in the suburbs -- lately many of economics' greatest successes have been outside the traditional boundaries of the discipline. In the study of law, economic ideas have been the intellectual focus and `law and economics' has become a major field. In the study of politics, economists and political scientists using economics-type methods are uniquely influential. In sociology and history, economics has had a smaller but growing influence through `rational choice sociology' and `cliometrics'. The influence of the economists type thinking in other social sciences is bringing about a theoretical integration of all the social sciences under one overarching paradigm. The chapters of the book illustrate the intellectual advances that account for this unified view of economies and societies.

Suggested Citation

  • Olson, Mancur & Kahkohnen, Satu (ed.), 2000. "A Not-so-dismal Science: A Broader View of Economies and Societies," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198294900.
  • Handle: RePEc:oxp:obooks:9780198294900

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Gordon,Robert J., 2004. "Productivity Growth, Inflation, and Unemployment," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521531429, March.
    2. Dale W. Jorgenson, 2001. "Information Technology and the U.S. Economy," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(1), pages 1-32, March.
    3. Gordon,Robert J., 2004. "Productivity Growth, Inflation, and Unemployment," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521800082, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Asli Demirgüç-Kunt & Ross Levine, 2009. "Finance and Inequality: Theory and Evidence," Annual Review of Financial Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 1(1), pages 287-318, November.
    2. Kherallah, Mylène & Kirsten, Johann, 2001. "The new institutional economics," MSSD discussion papers 41, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Kirsten, Johann F., 2004. "Expanding the Frontiers of Agricultural Economics to Meet the Future Challenges of Agricultural Development," 2004 Inaugural Symposium, December 6-8, 2004, Nairobi, Kenya 9519, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).

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