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Exchange Rate System and the IMF: A Modest Agenda, The


  • Morris Goldstein

    (Peterson Institute for International Economics)


Global currency markets have remained unsettled. The dollar hit record lows against both the yen and the mark in 1995. The Mexican crisis led to a free fall of the peso. Renewed tensions in the European Monetary System required devaluations in Spain and Portugal. It is thus fortuitous that the world s major countries, starting with the G-7 summit in Italy in June 1994, have agreed to reexamine the world monetary system and the role of its chief institutional custodian the International Monetary Fund. Yet there is little agreement on what should be done. Sweeping change in the form of explicit, binding exchange rate targets for the United States, Japan, and Europe does not seem to be in the cards. More limited reforms might gain more acceptance. But what should be the nature of those reforms? Would they be worth the effort? This study sets out a modest agenda for managing the exchange rate system, improving the system s early warning capabilities, and strengthening the IMF s oversight responsibilities. It could help improve functioning of the world economy and global financial stability.

Suggested Citation

  • Morris Goldstein, 1995. "Exchange Rate System and the IMF: A Modest Agenda, The," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number pa39.
  • Handle: RePEc:iie:ppress:pa39
    Note: Policy Analyses in International Economics 39

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Carmen M. Reinhart & Kenneth S. Rogoff, 2011. "From Financial Crash to Debt Crisis," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(5), pages 1676-1706, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jeffrey Frankel., 1995. "How Well Do Foreign Exchange Markets Function: Might a Tobin Tax Help?," Center for International and Development Economics Research (CIDER) Working Papers C95-058, University of California at Berkeley.
    2. Jeffrey Frankel & Sergio Schmukler & Luis Serven, 2000. "Verifiability and the Vanishing Intermediate Exchange Rate Regime," NBER Working Papers 7901, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Anne O. Krueger, 1998. "Whither the World Bank and the IMF?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 36(4), pages 1983-2020, December.
    4. Dominick Salvatore, 1998. "International Monetary and Financial Arrangements: Present and Future," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 9(1), pages 375-416, January.
    5. Simwaka, Kisu, 2010. "Choice of exchange rate regimes for African countries: Fixed or Flexible Exchange rate regimes?," MPRA Paper 23129, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Jeffrey A. Frankel & Andrew K. Rose, 2000. "Estimating the Effect of Currency Unions on Trade and Output," NBER Working Papers 7857, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Robert Aliber, 2000. "Capital Flows, Exchange Rates, and the New International Financial Architecture: Six Financial Crises in Search of a Generic Explanation," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 11(1), pages 43-61, August.
    8. Baldwin, Richard E., 2006. "The euro's trade effects," Working Paper Series 594, European Central Bank.

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