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Building Capitalism

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  • Aslund,Anders

Abstract

A most comprehensive empirical analysis of the economic transformation of the former Soviet bloc during the first decade after communism. It debunks many myths, seeing transition as a struggle between radical reformers and those thriving on rent seeking. People have gained from fast and comprehensive reforms, but several countries have gotten stuck in corruption. Economic decline and social hazards have been greatly exaggerated, since people have forgotten how awful communism was. Swift liberalization of prices and foreign trade, as well as rapid and profound fiscal adjustment, have been vital for growth, institutional reforms, legality and greater equity. Privatization has been beneficial, and its effects will grow over time. The main problem has been the continuation of unregulated and ubiquitous state apparatuses living on corruption, while no country has suffered from too radical reforms. Where malpractices of the elite can be checked, market reforms and democracy have proceeded together.

Suggested Citation

  • Aslund,Anders, 2002. "Building Capitalism," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521805254.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:cbooks:9780521805254
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    Cited by:

    1. Valev, Neven, 2004. "No pain, no gain: market reform, unemployment, and politics in Bulgaria," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 409-425, September.
    2. Marek Dabrowski & Artur Radziwill, 2007. "Regional vs. Global Public Goods: The Case of Post-Communist Transition," CASE Network Studies and Analyses 0336, CASE-Center for Social and Economic Research.
    3. Dimiter IALNAZOV & Nikolay NENOVSKY, 2010. "The Evolution of Post-Communist Countries: An Interpretation from the Perspective of Cooperation," LEO Working Papers / DR LEO 1600, Orleans Economics Laboratory / Laboratoire d'Economie d'Orleans (LEO), University of Orleans.
    4. Richard L. Carson, 2009. "The Effect of Rent Seeking on Economics Growth," Carleton Economic Papers 09-10, Carleton University, Department of Economics, revised 19 Dec 2016.
    5. Dirk Bezemer & Uwe Dulleck & Paul Frijters, 2003. "Contacts, Social Capital and Market Institutions - A Theory of Development," Vienna Economics Papers 0311, University of Vienna, Department of Economics.
    6. Dirk Bezemer & Uwe Dulleck & Paul Frijters, 2003. "Socialism, Capitalism, and Transition - Coordination of Economic Relations and Output Performance," School of Economics and Finance Discussion Papers and Working Papers Series 168a, School of Economics and Finance, Queensland University of Technology.
    7. Dimiter Ialnazov & Nikolay Nenovsky, 2011. "A Game Theory Interpretation of the Post-Communist Evolution," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(1), pages 41-56.
    8. Gerald Easter, 2014. "State Finances In Post-Communist Poland: Building Capacity And Consent," Public administration issues, Higher School of Economics, issue 5, pages 76-95.
    9. Neven Valev & John A. Carlson, 2002. "Tenuous Financial Stability," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper0210, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
    10. Laszlo Csaba, 2005. "Regulation and Public Sector Development: A Post-Transition Perspective," Post-Communist Economies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(2), pages 137-152.

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