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Allocating scarce resources for endangered species recovery

Author

Listed:
  • Benjamin M. Simon

    (Policy Analysts with the Department of the Interior, Office of Policy Analysis, in Washington, DC)

  • Craig S. Leff

    (Policy Analysts with the Department of the Interior, Office of Policy Analysis, in Washington, DC)

  • Harvey Doerksen

    (Policy Analysts with the Department of the Interior, Office of Policy Analysis, in Washington, DC)

Abstract

This article examines the relationship between fiscal year 1990 Fish and Wildlife Service spending on endangered species recovery and the priority ranking assigned by the Fish and Wildlife Service to particular species. The focus of the analysis is on the extent to which resources were allocated to species assigned higher priority rankings. The major conclusions are: species' recovery priority rank is not related to funding decisions by the Fish and Wildlife Service; some of the individual factors that make up the overall priority ranking-recovery potential and conflict with development-are correlated to funding decisions; and the likelihood of receiving some Fish and Wildlife Service recovery funding was greater for mammals, birds, and fish.

Suggested Citation

  • Benjamin M. Simon & Craig S. Leff & Harvey Doerksen, 1995. "Allocating scarce resources for endangered species recovery," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(3), pages 415-432.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:jpamgt:v:14:y:1995:i:3:p:415-432
    DOI: 10.2307/3325033
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ariane Manuela Amin, 2012. "What Drives Biodiversity Conservation Effort in the Developing World? An analysis for Sub-Saharan Africa," Working Papers halshs-00722081, HAL.
    2. Paul J. Ferraro, 2003. "Assigning priority to environmental policy interventions in a heterogeneous world," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(1), pages 27-43.
    3. Deborah Dawson & Jason F. Shogren, 2001. "An Update on Priorities and Expenditures under the Endangered Species Act," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 77(4), pages 527-532.
    4. Ariane Amin & Johanna Choumert, 2015. "Development and biodiversity conservation in Sub-Saharan Africa: A spatial analysis," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 35(1), pages 729-744.
    5. Dyar, Julie A. & Wagner, Jeffrey, 2003. "Uncertainty and species recovery program design," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 45(2, Supple), pages 505-522, March.
    6. Robert P. Berrens & Alok K. Bohara & Amy Baker & Ken Baker, 1999. "Revealed preferences of a state bureau: Case of New Mexico's underground storage tank program," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(2), pages 303-326.
    7. Amin, Ariane, 2016. "Exploring the role of economic incentives and spillover effects in biodiversity conservation policies in sub-Saharan Africa," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 127(C), pages 185-191.
    8. Maresova, Jana & Frynta, Daniel, 2008. "Noah's Ark is full of common species attractive to humans: The case of boid snakes in zoos," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(3), pages 554-558, January.
    9. Ando, Amy, 1998. "Delay on the Path to the Endangered Species List: Do Costs and Benefits Matter," Discussion Papers dp-97-43-rev, Resources For the Future.
    10. Langpap, Christian & Kerkvliet, Joe, 2002. "Success Or Failure? Ordered Probit Approaches To Measuring The Effectiveness Of The Endangered Species Act," 2002 Annual meeting, July 28-31, Long Beach, CA 19713, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    11. Kerkvliet, Joe & Langpap, Christian, 2007. "Learning from endangered and threatened species recovery programs: A case study using U.S. Endangered Species Act recovery scores," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(2-3), pages 499-510, August.
    12. Heidi J. Albers & Amy W. Ando, 2003. "Could State-Level Variation in the Number of Land Trusts Make Economic Sense?," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 79(3), pages 311-327.
    13. Ando, Amy Whritenour, 1999. "Waiting to Be Protected under the Endangered Species Act: The Political Economy of Regulatory Delay," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 42(1), pages 29-60, April.
    14. Christian Langpap & Joe Kerkvliet, 2010. "Allocating Conservation Resources Under The Endangered Species Act," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 92(1), pages 110-124.

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