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Estimating an EQ‐5D population value set: the case of Japan

Author

Listed:
  • Aki Tsuchiya
  • Shunya Ikeda
  • Naoki Ikegami
  • Shuzo Nishimura
  • Ikuro Sakai
  • Takashi Fukuda
  • Chisato Hamashima
  • Akinori Hisashige
  • Makoto Tamura

Abstract

Quality adjustment weights for quality‐adjusted life years (QALYs) are available with the EQ‐5D Instrument, which are based on a survey that quantified the preferences of the British public. However, the extent to which this British value set is applicable to other, especially non‐European, countries is yet unclear. The objectives of this study are (a) to compare the valuations obtained in Japan and Britain, and (b) to explore a local Japanese value set. A diminished study design is employed, where 17 hypothetical EQ‐5D health states are evaluated as opposed to 42 in the British study. The official Japanese version of the instrument and the Time Trade‐Off method are used to interview 543 members of the public. The results are: firstly, the evaluations obtained in Japan and those from Britain differ by 0.24 on average on a [−1, +1] scale, and mean absolute error (MAE) in predicting the Japanese preferences with the British value set is 0.23. Secondly, comparable regressions suggest that the two peoples have systematically different preference structures (p

Suggested Citation

  • Aki Tsuchiya & Shunya Ikeda & Naoki Ikegami & Shuzo Nishimura & Ikuro Sakai & Takashi Fukuda & Chisato Hamashima & Akinori Hisashige & Makoto Tamura, 2002. "Estimating an EQ‐5D population value set: the case of Japan," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 11(4), pages 341-353, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:11:y:2002:i:4:p:341-353
    DOI: 10.1002/hec.673
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Paul Dolan & Claire Gudex & Paul Kind & Alan Williams, 1995. "A social tariff for EuroQol: results from a UK general population survey," Working Papers 138chedp, Centre for Health Economics, University of York.
    2. Claire Gudex, 1994. "Time trade-off user manual: props and self-completion methods," Working Papers 020cheop, Centre for Health Economics, University of York.
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