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Averting Behavior in the Presence of Public Spillovers: Household Control of Nuisance Pests

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  • Paul M. Jakus

Abstract

This paper empirically implements an averting behavior model for gypsy moth control, explicitly recognizing the joint private and public spillover motivations for control. The results demonstrate that averting behavior models can capture complex behavioral influences, suggesting that such models can be extended beyond health-related applications. The model yields a reduced form parameter which cannot be identified using actual behavior data alone. A method combining models of actual behavior and contingent behavior is proposed as a way to directly measure the production and preference effects.

Suggested Citation

  • Paul M. Jakus, 1994. "Averting Behavior in the Presence of Public Spillovers: Household Control of Nuisance Pests," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 70(3), pages 273-285.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:landec:v:70:y:1994:i:3:p:273-285
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    Cited by:

    1. Michele Graziano Ceddia & Jaakko Heikkilä & Jukka Peltola, 2008. "Biosecurity in agriculture: an economic analysis of coexistence of professional and hobby production ," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 52(4), pages 453-470, December.
    2. John Whitehead & Ju-Chin Huang & Glenn Blomquist & Richard Ready, 1998. "Construct Validity of Dichotomous and Polychotomous Choice Contingent Valuation Questions," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 11(1), pages 107-116, January.
    3. Shafran, Aric P., 2008. "Risk externalities and the problem of wildfire risk," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(2), pages 488-495, September.
    4. Anthony Heyes, 2001. "A Note on Defensive Expenditures: Harmonised Law, Diverse Results," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 19(3), pages 257-266, July.
    5. Jason F. Shogren & Tommy Stamland, 2005. "Self-Protection and Value of Statistical Life Estimation," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 81(1).
    6. McConnell, Kenneth E. & Bockstael, Nancy E., 2006. "Valuing the Environment as a Factor of Production," Handbook of Environmental Economics,in: K. G. Mäler & J. R. Vincent (ed.), Handbook of Environmental Economics, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 14, pages 621-669 Elsevier.
    7. Templeton, Scott & Silberman, David & Yoo, Seung & Dabalen, Andrew, 2007. "Household use of Pesticides and Fertilizers For Pest-Soil Management and Own Time for Yard Work," Research Reports 187455, Clemson University, Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics.
    8. Cai, Yongxia & Shaw, W. Douglass & Wu, Ximing, 2008. "Risk Perception and Altruistic Averting Behavior: Removing Arsenic in Drinking Water," 2008 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2008, Orlando, Florida 6149, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    9. J. Amarnath & S. Krishnamoorthy, 2001. "Study on Relationship between Productivity, Inputs and Environmental Quality in Tannery Effluent Affected Farms of Tamil Nadu," Water Resources Management: An International Journal, Published for the European Water Resources Association (EWRA), Springer;European Water Resources Association (EWRA), vol. 15(1), pages 1-15, February.
    10. Tamini, Lota D., 2009. "Agri-Environment Advisory Activities Effects on Best Management Practices Adoption," MPRA Paper 18961, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. John C. Whitehead & George Van Houtven, "undated". "Methods for Valuing the Benefits of the Safe Drinking Water Act: Review and Assessment," Working Papers 9705, East Carolina University, Department of Economics.
    12. John C. Whitehead & Thomas J. Hoban & George Van Houtven, 1999. "Averting Behavior and Drinking Water Quality," Working Papers 9905, East Carolina University, Department of Economics.

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