IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Optimal Allocation of Time and Estimation of Market Wage Functions

  • B. F. Kiker
  • M. Mendes de Oliveira
Registered author(s):

    Second-generation studies of wage determination are based on the observation that wages of employed workers are a biased sample of the true population values because of selectivity, and a well-known two-stage method to correct for selectivity bias has been proposed by Heckman (1976). The basic notion behind the second-generation approach is that, in a setting of optimal decision making, the individual's choice of market work or not conveys valuable information that can improve our ability to estimate market wage equations. In this paper, we extend second-generation studies by proposing that there is additional useful information for estimating market wage functions in knowing not only if participation occurs, but also knowing how many hours a person actually works in a household sector (as opposed to consuming "pure" leisure). Accordingly, we extend the conventional work-leisure model of labor supply to accommodate time devoted to household production and adopt an estimation technique that addresses simultaneously the issues of sample censoring and the joint determination of nonmarket returns and nonmarket time. It appears that the disentanglement of the effects of investments in human capital on market and nonmarket productivity lead to sizably higher labor market returns to schooling, tenure, and experience for women than those obtained by standard approaches.

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

    File URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/pdfplus/146171
    Download Restriction: A subscription is required to access pdf files. Pay per article is available.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

    Article provided by University of Wisconsin Press in its journal Journal of Human Resources.

    Volume (Year): 27 (1992)
    Issue (Month): 3 ()
    Pages: 445-471

    as
    in new window

    Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:27:y:1992:i:3:p:445-471
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://jhr.uwpress.org/

    No references listed on IDEAS
    You can help add them by filling out this form.

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:27:y:1992:i:3:p:445-471. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: ()

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.