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Unemployment Behavior: Evidence from the CPS Work Experience Survey

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  • Thomas S. Coleman

Abstract

This paper discusses the nature and uses of data on individual unemployment experience available from the Current Population Survey (CPS). The purpose of the paper is two-fold: first, to describe the general statistical process generating such data and then to assume a specific, tractable, stochastic process by which the data could have been generated; and second, to carefully determine what, if anything, these data can tell us about the nature of unemployment. The conclusions from the empirical analysis are two: First, entry rates into unemployment and differences in entry rates across people are more important than spell exit rates for explaining unemployment during the year and levels of unemployment. Second, there appear to be some inconsistencies between inferences drawn from the experience data and those drawn from other data sets.

Suggested Citation

  • Thomas S. Coleman, 1989. "Unemployment Behavior: Evidence from the CPS Work Experience Survey," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 24(1), pages 1-38.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:24:y:1989:i:1:p:1-38
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    Cited by:

    1. Margo Robert A., 1993. "The Labor Force Participation of Older Americans in 1900: Further Results," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 409-423, October.
    2. Dora L. Costa, 1993. "Explaining the Changing Dynamics of Unemployment: Evidence from Civil War Records," NBER Historical Working Papers 0051, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. L. Quillian, "undated". "How Long Do African Americans Stay in High-Poverty Neighborhoods? An Analysis of Spells," Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Papers 1203-00, University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty.
    4. Ann Huff Stevens, 1999. "Climbing out of Poverty, Falling Back in: Measuring the Persistence of Poverty Over Multiple Spells," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 34(3), pages 557-588.
    5. Falk, Armin & Huffman, David B. & Sunde, Uwe, 2006. "Do I Have What It Takes? Equilibrium Search with Type Uncertainty and Non-Participation," IZA Discussion Papers 2531, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Marie-Christine Challier & Mohamed Jellal, 1992. "Analyses du chômage de longue durée et du chômage récurrent le cas de la France," Économie et Prévision, Programme National Persée, vol. 105(4), pages 55-72.
    7. Jaap H. Abbring & Gerard J. Van Den Berg, 2007. "The unobserved heterogeneity distribution in duration analysis," Biometrika, Biometrika Trust, vol. 94(1), pages 87-99.

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