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Learning by Striking: Estimates of the Teetotaler Effect

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  • Schnell, John F
  • Gramm, Cynthia L

Abstract

The authors hypothesize that past strike experience will have a negative or "teetotaler" effect on a collective bargaining unit's propensity to strike in future negotiations, other things being equal. They test this using a unique micro-level sample comprising four consecutive negotiations by 147 bargaining units in U.S. manufacturing industries, controlling for observable and unobservable differences among bargaining pairs in the propensity to strike. The results are consistent with the view that the experience of striking is, indeed, sobering: lagged strike experience variables have a significantly negative effect on the propensity to strike in the current negotiation. Copyright 1987 by University of Chicago Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Schnell, John F & Gramm, Cynthia L, 1987. "Learning by Striking: Estimates of the Teetotaler Effect," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 5(2), pages 221-241, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:5:y:1987:i:2:p:221-41
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    Cited by:

    1. William H. Greene & Ana P. Martins, 2013. "Striking Features of the Labor Market: Empirical Evidence," Journal of Economics and Econometrics, Economics and Econometrics Society, vol. 56(2), pages 25-53.
    2. Robert Rich & Joseph Tracy, 2004. "Uncertainty and Labor Contract Durations," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 86(1), pages 270-287, February.
    3. Campolieti, Michele, 2015. "State dependence in the incidence of strikes: Evidence from Canadian contract data using Heckman’s dynamic probit model," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 133(C), pages 7-9.
    4. William H. Greene & Ana P. Martins, 2013. "Striking Features of the Labor Market: Theory," Journal of Economics and Econometrics, Economics and Econometrics Society, vol. 56(2), pages 1-24.
    5. George Neumann, 1996. "Search Models and Duration Data," Econometrics 9602008, EconWPA, revised 07 Mar 1996.
    6. Santiago Sanchez-Pages, 2004. "Conflict as a Part of the Bargaining Process: Theory and Empirical Evidence," ESE Discussion Papers 129, Edinburgh School of Economics, University of Edinburgh.
    7. William H. Greene & Ana P. Martins, 2002. "Striking Features of the Labor Market," EERI Research Paper Series EERI RP 2002/08, Economics and Econometrics Research Institute (EERI), Brussels.

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