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Wealth Mobility

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  • Nancy A. Jianakoplos
  • Paul L. Menchik

Abstract

This paper examines the wealth mobility of a panel of mature American men between 1966 and 1981. Although greater persistence exists than within the income distribution, a sizeable degree of movement within the wealth distribution is observed. Slightly more than half of the households changed quintiles. However, the magnitude of the movement was modest, with 78% of the moves to an adjacent quintile. Movements into either extreme of the wealth distribution were relatively rare. Really big moves, from the poorest to richest group, were extremely rare, with the probability of a black making such a move within fifteen years approximately zero. © 2001 by the President and Fellows of Harvard College and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Suggested Citation

  • Nancy A. Jianakoplos & Paul L. Menchik, 1997. "Wealth Mobility," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 79(1), pages 18-31, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:tpr:restat:v:79:y:1997:i:1:p:18-31
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    Cited by:

    1. Stucchi, Rodolfo, 2007. "What determines productivity dynamics at the firm level? Evidence from Spain," MPRA Paper 6564, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. John Gibson & Trinh Le & Steven Stillman, 2007. "What explains the wealth gap between immigrants and the New Zealand born?," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(2), pages 131-162.
    3. Brian Nolan & Gosta Esping-Andersen & Christopher T. Whelan & Bertrand Maitre, 2010. "The Role of Social Institutions in Inter-Generational Mobility," Working Papers 201018, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
    4. Hochguertel, Stefan & Ohlsson, Henry, 2011. "Wealth mobility and dynamics over entire individual working life cycles," Working Paper Series 1301, European Central Bank.
    5. Michael Kremer, 1996. "How Much Does Sorting Increase Inequality?," NBER Working Papers 5566, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Gokhale, Jagadeesh & Kotlikoff, Laurence J. & Sefton, James & Weale, Martin, 2001. "Simulating the transmission of wealth inequality via bequests," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 79(1), pages 93-128, January.
    7. Figueroa, Adolfo, 2008. "Competition and circulation of economic elites: Theory and application to the case of Peru," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 48(2), pages 263-273, May.
    8. Hochguertel, Stefan & Ohlsson, Henry, 2012. "Who is at the top? Wealth mobility over the life cycle," Working Paper Series 2012:1, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
    9. John Fitzgerald & Peter Gottschalk & Robert Moffitt, 1998. "An Analysis of the Impact of Sample Attrition on the Second Generation of Respondents in the Michigan Panel Study of Income Dynamics," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 33(2), pages 300-344.
    10. Danny Ben-Shahar & Eyal Sulganik, 2011. "Vacancy chains and the degree of mobility in the housing market," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 47(3), pages 569-583, December.
    11. David Andolfatto & James Redekop, 1998. "Redistribution Policy in a Model with Heterogeneous Time Preference," Cahiers de recherche CREFE / CREFE Working Papers 66, CREFE, Université du Québec à Montréal.
    12. Mathias Sommer, 2008. "Understanding the trends in income, consumption and wealth inequality and how important are life-cycle effects?," MEA discussion paper series 08160, Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA) at the Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy.

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