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The Influence of Performance-Based Accountability on the Distribution of Teacher Salary Increases

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  • Robert Bifulco

    () (Center for Policy Research, Syracuse University)

Abstract

This study examines how aspects of a district's institutional and policy environment influence the distribution of teacher salary increases. The primary hypothesis tested is that statewide performance-based accountability policies influence the extent to which districts backload teacher salary increases. I use data on teacher salaries from the National Center for Education Statistics Schools and Staffing Survey and an index of performance-based accountability to examine the relationship between accountability and backloading. Consistent with the study's hypothesis, the results indicate that strong performance-based, state-level accountability is associated with decreases in teacher salary backloading among urban districts. © 2010 American Education Finance Association

Suggested Citation

  • Robert Bifulco, 2010. "The Influence of Performance-Based Accountability on the Distribution of Teacher Salary Increases," Education Finance and Policy, MIT Press, vol. 5(2), pages 177-199, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:tpr:edfpol:v:5:y:2010:i:2:p:177-199
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Brunner, Eric J. & Squires, Tim, 2013. "The bargaining power of teachers’ unions and the allocation of school resources," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 15-27.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    teacher salaries; performance-based accountability;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I22 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Educational Finance; Financial Aid

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